Longer Looks When An ER Doctor Becomes An ER Patient Google Glass

first_imgLonger Looks: When An ER Doctor Becomes An ER Patient; Google Glass Inside Operating Rooms Every week KHN reporter Marissa Evans finds interesting reads from around the web. San Francisco Magazine: My State Of EmergencyIf you are shot or stabbed in or around Oakland, you are likely to be sent [to Highland Hospital). Oakland has the highest violent crime rate in the nation, so I have indeed seen my fair share of victims over my long career here. … And yet, despite our knife-and-gun-club bravado, patching people’s bullet and stab wounds and dealing with drug-crazed patients is a tiny fraction of what I do. Patients everywhere suffer from pretty much the same ailments …. The poor get just as many heart attacks and broken arms as the wealthy do. The difference is that at Highland, we may be the only doctors our patients ever see. … Because of the Affordable Care Act, many—perhaps all—of these patients will for the first time be able to make an appointment to visit a primary care doctor in an office, rather than spending hours waiting to see me (Dr. Eric Snoey, 6/4).The Washington Post: Videos Aim To Inform Patients About Their Medical Options At The End Of LifeThe video was direct and dramatic. In a demonstration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, a technician pushed down hard on the chest of a dummy. A white-coated doctor narrating the video laid out grim odds: “Most of the time, in patients with advanced disease, CPR does not work,” she said. … Rare is the person who is willing to grapple openly with death. Health-care providers often don’t talk to patients about their preferences. And patients and their families often don’t know their options and avoid asking about them. For patients approaching the end of life, that can mean not knowing about palliative-care alternatives, which research has shown can significantly improve patient satisfaction and quality of life. Instead, they continue to get aggressive treatment. Clinicians and others trying to improve end-of-life communication between doctors and their patient have turned for help to a set of videos (Lena Sun, 6/2).The New York Times: Google Glass Enters The Operating RoomBefore scrubbing in on a recent Tuesday morning, Dr. Selene Parekh, an orthopedic surgeon here at Duke Medical Center, slipped on a pair of sleek, black glasses — Google Glass, the wearable computer with a built-in camera and monitor. He gave the Internet-connected glasses a voice command to start recording and turned to the middle-aged motorcycle crash victim on the operating table. He chiseled through bone, repaired a broken metatarsal and drilled a metal plate into the patient’s foot. Dr. Parekh has been using Glass since last year, when Google began selling test versions of its device to thousands of handpicked “explorers” for $1,500. He now uses it to record and archive all of his surgeries at Duke, and soon he will use it to stream live feeds of his operations to hospitals in India as a way to train and educate orthopedic surgeons there (Anahad O’Connor, 6/1).The Guardian: Talking About Mental Health: ‘So Much Of This Is Behind Closed Doors’When he was 22, Chris Gethard thought every day about killing himself. He thought about it so often that eventually it didn’t even feel weird any more. Then, one day, he pulled his car over to the side of a bridge. He was ready to jump. Instead, Gethard called his ex-girlfriend, who told him he had to get help immediately, and that if he didn’t by morning, she would call his mother. … That was 11 years ago. … He’s one of the relatively lucky ones. That night on the bridge – and later, when he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder – his parents had health insurance that covered him. Now, he is able to pay out of pocket for a therapist of his choosing, though he’s healthy enough that he barely feels the need for their bi-weekly meetings (Amanda Holpuch, 5/29).The Weekly Standard: Obamacare In The Blue StatesOne of the ironies of the Affordable Care Act is that many of the governors who zealously supported the bill failed spectacularly in its implementation. Oregon, Maryland, and Minnesota are among the most prominent failures. The Massachusetts exchange, the primary inspiration for the ACA exchanges, collapsed entirely, and state officials lack a plan for fixing it in time for this fall’s enrollments. After the passage of the ACA, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) instituted a management process to ensure accountability among states that chose to build their own exchanges instead of participating in HealthCare.gov. It involved “gate reviews,” a periodic assessment of progress in seven areas; CMS designed the process to ensure that continued federal funding would lead to secure and functional exchanges (Michael Astrue, 6/9). Health Affairs: ‘Nothing Is Broken’: For An Injured Doctor, Quality-Focused Care Misses The Mark As a medical professional who became an accident victim and then a trauma patient, I was a participant-observer in emergency care, with a big-picture window into how well our health care system does or doesn’t work. There’s just something about being boarded on a gurney in a hospital hallway for fifteen hours that gets one thinking about paradigm shifts. In my case, I was struck by the uneven nature of my care, marked by an overreliance on testing and a narrow focus on limited quality metrics such as pain management or catheter care processes. Looking back, I believe that this approach fostered an inattention to my overall well-being. Instead of feeling like a connected patient at the center of care, I felt processed and disengaged. This is disconcerting, especially at a time when patient-centered care—that is, care delivered with me, not to me or for me—is becoming the new normal (Dr. Charlotte Yeh, 6/2). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

Lawmakers Seek Lower Price For Bill On Vets Care

first_img This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Lawmakers Seek Lower Price For Bill On Vets’ Care Members of Congress are scrambling to lower the cost of a bill to fix veterans’ health care amid a growing uproar over long waits for appointments. Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal is reporting that congressional inaction is threatening a program for brain-damaged vets.The Associated Press: Lawmakers Seek Lower Price For Bill On Vets’ CareStung by sticker shock, members of Congress are scrambling to lower the cost of a bill to fix veterans’ health care amid a growing uproar over long waits for appointments and falsification of records to cover up the delays at Veterans Affairs hospitals. At the same time, deficit hawks fear that letting veterans turn more to providers outside the VA for health care could cost far more if Congress, under pressure from powerful veterans groups, decides to renew that program rather than let it expire in two years (7/11).The Wall Street Journal: Congressional Inaction Threatens Program For Brain-Damaged VetsThe Department of Veterans Affairs has begun ousting dozens of brain-damaged veterans from special therapeutic group homes, setting off a scramble for housing and care. In recent weeks, VA case workers have warned 53 veterans they’ll have to leave the privately run homes by Sept. 15, according to the agency. Ten have already been discharged from the care facilities and sent to nursing homes, state veterans homes or to live with family members (Phillips, 7/11).last_img read more

Survey Fewer Americans Struggle With Health Care Costs

first_img Los Angeles Times: Fewer Americans Delayed Needed Medical Care In 2014, Survey Says This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Not only do more Americans have health insurance, but the number struggling with medical costs has dropped since President Barack Obama’s health care law expanded coverage, according to a study released Thursday. The Commonwealth Fund’s biennial health insurance survey found that the share of U.S. adults who did not get needed care because of cost dropped from 43 percent in 2012 to 36 percent last year, as the health care law’s main coverage expansion went into full swing. (Alonso-Zaldivar, 1/15) The Associated Press: Study: Fewer Struggle With Medical Costs As Coverage Grows center_img Survey: Fewer Americans Struggle With Health Care Costs In its biennial health insurance survey, the Commonwealth Fund found that more people have health coverage and fewer people say they are delaying necessary medical care because of costs. From 2012 to 2014, the share of consumers delaying a recommended test or treatment or not filling a prescription fell by nearly a third. And the percentage who reported problems with medical bills fell by almost a quarter. Those are the first declines ever recorded by the biennial national survey by the nonprofit Commonwealth Fund, which began asking Americans about the affordability of medical care a decade ago. (Levey, 1/14) last_img read more

33 off Ring Video Doorbells Grab this Prime Day banger while you

first_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. On the hunt for more cracking Prime Day 2019 deals? Then make sure to bookmark our Amazon Prime Day 2019 hub page where our team of experts will hand pick the best live deals.For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKWe may earn a commission if you click a deal and buy an item. That’s why we want to make sure you’re well-informed and happy with your purchase so that you’ll continue to rely on us for your buying advice needs. Amazon Prime Day Deals Amazon’s slashed up to 33% off the price of Ring’s smart doorbells as part of a series of amazingly good Prime Day deals.The deals are live now and related to the top-dog Ring Video Doorbell Pro, Ring Video Doorbell 2 and Ring Video Doorbell (first gen). Best Ring Video Doorbells – Amazon Prime DayRing Video Doorbell Pro | Kit with Chime and Transformer, 1080p HD, Two-Way Talk, Wi-Fi, Motion DetectionAmazon|Save £80|Now £229.00View DealNow £229.00|Save £80|AmazonRing Video Doorbell 2 | 1080p HD Video, Two-Way Talk, Motion Detection, Wi-Fi ConnectedAmazon|Save £60|Now £179.00View DealNow £179.00|Save £60|AmazonRing Video Doorbell | HD video doorbell with motion-activated notifications and two-way talkAmazon|Save £20|Now £89.00View DealNow £89.00|Save £20|Amazoncenter_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. It’ll let you nab a Ring Pro for £149, a market drop on the £229 you’d normally have to pay for it. Below it the Ring 2 has had a healthy £60 discount, letting you snap one up for £179. If you’re on a serious budget the first gen ring has had £20 chopped off its £89.99 RRP letting you grab it for £69.99.Ring doorbells are excellent additions to any smart home setup. The video camera doorbells make it quick and easy for you remotely check who’s at your door, even while out about. Advanced security features also let them alert you if someone’s trying to break in.If you’re after the ultimate security experience the Pro is the way to go. It features a more discreet design that connects directly to your home’s mains, removing the need for you to remember to charge it, as you have to on the Ring 2 and Ring 1. It also has a few advanced features you won’t get on the other Ring cameras.As we explained in our Ring Video Doorbell Pro review:“A powerful and flexible way to protect your home, the Ring Video Doorbell Pro is a step up from the battery-powered models and is a better choice if you have a mains-powered doorbell, as you get full motion detection activity zones to cut down on the number of alerts you get.“A slim body and choice of cases makes this doorbell look great, and you get everything you need for installation in the box.”Related: Amazon Prime Day Smart Home DealsIf you’re after something a little less casual and don’t fancy the extra DIY the second gen Ring 2 doorbell is an excellent option.As we noted in our Ring Video Doorbell 2 review:“The Video Doorbell 2 is designed for security and convenience, and is the second iteration of Ring’s smart doorbell […] Improved battery charging, Full HD video and interchangeable faceplates make the new product far more flexible than the original Video Doorbell.”If you just need the absolute basics don’t be put off the first gen Ring though. The device may lack some of the other two’s more advanced features, but if you just want to see who’s ringing your doorbell while out and about it’s still a solid purchase. Best Ring Video Doorbells – Amazon Prime DayRing Video Doorbell Pro | Kit with Chime and Transformer, 1080p HD, Two-Way Talk, Wi-Fi, Motion DetectionAmazon|Save £80|Now £229.00View DealNow £229.00|Save £80|AmazonRing Video Doorbell 2 | 1080p HD Video, Two-Way Talk, Motion Detection, Wi-Fi ConnectedAmazon|Save £60|Now £179.00View DealNow £179.00|Save £60|AmazonRing Video Doorbell | HD video doorbell with motion-activated notifications and two-way talkAmazon|Save £20|Now £89.00View DealNow £89.00|Save £20|Amazon Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

All Trudeau has built with infrastructure program is towering expectations

first_img Kevin Carmichael Public administration is hard enough when all a government wants to do is tinker; a tax cut here, a few rule changes there, maybe a new trade agreement if the stars align.It is extremely difficult when the objective is transformative change; think Jean Chrétien’s and Paul Martin’s overhaul of Canadian fiscal policy in the 1990s or the exertions of the Democratic majority in Washington to introduce universal health care in 2010.This brings us to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s infrastructure program, the latest reminder that good ideas don’t implement themselves.In 2015, Trudeau told us voters that he would abandon balanced budgets in order to build roads, bridges, metro lines and other infrastructure that would make Canada’s economy bigger and more competitive. Canadian voters endorsed a return to deficit financing in surprisingly strong numbers. Four years later, many of those people must be disenchanted, notwithstanding what they might think of the prime minister’s ditching of electoral reform, his star-crossed sojourn in India, and his decision to take the side of the white men running SNC-Lavalin over the Indigenous woman running his justice department. Report raises fresh doubts over economic benefits of Trudeau’s $188 billion infrastructure plan What has Trudeau’s Infrastructure Bank achieved? A recycled loan and millions in expenses ‘We’re delivering’: Ottawa defends infrastructure program critics say has been hobbled by delays Trudeau took about $90 billion left unspent by Stephen Harper’s government, budgeted about $100 billion in new spending, and unveiled to much fanfare a record-setting commitment to infrastructure. Yet only about $19 billion of that money has been spent, the National Post’s Jesse Snyder reported on March 13, citing Infrastructure Canada data. The Parliamentary Budget Office reported last year that program was responsible for a “modest” increase in gross domestic product, and said this week that provinces appear to have used the promise of money from Ottawa as an excuse to reduce their own infrastructure budgets. Meanwhile, the budget deficit, which Trudeau once promised to erase by 2019, is about $20 billion and the economy nearly stalled in the fourth quarter.“Expectations were too high, they were unrealistic,” Mahmood Nanji, a former Ontario finance ministry official who now is director of the Lawrence Centre for Policy and Management at Ivey Business School, told me in a phone interview on March 14.Trudeau shares the same political lineage as Chrétien and Martin, and he and Obama reportedly became fast friends. Either those men are poor mentors, or Trudeau is an uninterested student, because he appears to have missed the most important lessons of the 1990’s budget cuts and the tortured history of Obamacare.The previous Liberal government’s austerity program was successful because Martin managed expectations, which helped him demonstrate success. That kept the public behind him.Obama and his highly educated advisers devised a program that survived Washington’s gauntlet of lobbyists, but they took the boring part — implementation — for granted. The website on which many Americans were to purchase their subsidized health plans crashed out of the gate, and it took months to get it working. The failure emboldened the Republican campaign to repeal the law. The Democratic Party lost control of the House of Representatives and the Senate, and Obama never really recovered politically.Trudeau’s experience with infrastructure mirrors Obama’s star-crossed experiment with health policy. He had the right idea. Canada had been underfunding infrastructure for decades, and it showed in the country’s miserable productivity numbers. A significant body of research shows that spending that boosts competitiveness will pay for itself through stronger economic growth. Canada is better off now that the balanced-budget spell has been broken.But some politicians continue to see red ink as the answer to everything. And now, the fiscal zealots have the upper hand in the debate because the infrastructure program hasn’t delivered what was promised. “They developed an infrastructure policy with zero evidence or research on the economic benefits,” Matt Jeneroux, the Conservative infrastructure critic, said after the release of the latest critical PBO report.That matters. In January, Nanji and some co-authors at Ivey published a paper that aims to get policy makers thinking differently about infrastructure. They describe six macro risks that they contend are responsible for delays, poor decisions, and blown project budgets. One of those is political risk.Nanji reckons Canada needs to spend billions of dollars more a year than is currently budgeted to reach its economic potential. Yet it’s fair to wonder what would become of Trudeau’s existing infrastructure promises if he loses the election. Before the SNC-Lavalin scandal broke, the Opposition was spending most of its time making a fuss over the deficit. If the Conservatives win, and balancing the budget becomes a priority, the infrastructure program would be an obvious place to cut.“In good economic times, a balanced budget should be in the forefront of politicians’ minds,” said Nanji. However, given the infrastructure deficit, he added that politicians should be asking a different question: “What is a reasonable deficit that you can manage?”You reduce political risk by creating systems that shield strategic policy decisions from the election cycle.The Trudeau government has tended to blame the provinces for failing to figure out how they wanted to spend the money, but Ottawa should have seen it coming. Australia has an independent agency that assess what the country needs to maximize its economic potential. Nanji’s report proposes that Canada’s various levels of government could agree on a list of priority projects that are worth of funding, regardless of who is in power at any given time.Here’s the point: a country that is serious about infrastructure will remove politics from the equation to the greatest extent possible. Something for Trudeau to consider, if it isn’t already too late.• Email: kcarmichael@postmedia.com | Twitter: Twitter Reddit All Trudeau has built with infrastructure program is towering expectations Kevin Carmichael: The point is, a country that is serious about infrastructure will remove politics from the equation to the greatest extent possible Share this storyAll Trudeau has built with infrastructure program is towering expectations Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn ← Previous Next → Recommended For YouAcasta Enterprises Announces $15.5 Million Reduction of Bank Indebtedness and Proposed New Commercial Bank Credit FacilitiesTrump administration freezing fuel efficiency penaltiesSandy Hook parents lose state court appeal against Newtown over school shootingLockheed Martin plans to expand Milwaukee plant workforce by 15%Gibraltar police release all crew members of detained Iranian tanker Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s infrastructure program is the latest reminder that good ideas don’t implement themselves, writes Kevin Carmichael.Trevor Hagan/The Canadian Press/File March 15, 201910:56 PM EDTLast UpdatedMarch 16, 20192:52 PM EDT Filed under News Economy Emailcenter_img Facebook 26 Comments What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Join the conversation → Featured Stories advertisement Sponsored By: Comment Morelast_img read more

Down to Business podcast How Canadas largest sports company is grappling with

first_img If you have any questions about the show, or if there are topics you want us to tackle, email us: downtobusiness@postmedia.com. Down to Business podcast: Why the Canada-China trade relationship is making Canadian businesses uneasy Down to Business podcast: The real culprit behind Vancouver’s runaway real estate Emily Jackson 0 Comments Twitter Facebook Reddit More Email Welcome to Down to Business, a weekly podcast from the Financial Post.To celebrate the Toronto Raptors making the NBA finals, our sixth episode covers North America’s $70-billion sports market. Humza Teherany, the chief technology and digital officer at Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment, talks to host Emily Jackson about how technology is changing the business and fan experience of major league sports.You can listen below — or on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Google Play, where you can also subscribe to get new episodes every Wednesday morning. Down to Business podcast: How Canada’s largest sports company is grappling with digital disruption Episode 6 of the weekly podcast from the Financial Post Sponsored By: center_img Share this storyDown to Business podcast: How Canada’s largest sports company is grappling with digital disruption Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn May 29, 20196:44 AM EDT Filed under News FP Street Comment Join the conversation → Featured Stories advertisement Recommended For YouTwo top banks slash CannTrust price target in half because of Health Canada probeUPDATE 1-Weak economic data, rate cut expectations dampen sterlingBlockchain-based payments could help solve growth constraints in the burgeoning Esports industryJuror urges U.S. judge to uphold $80 mln Roundup verdict against BayerNew Gold Hosts Rainy River Site Tours ← Previous Next → What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generationlast_img read more

VW chooses SK Innovations as additional battery supplier for North America and

first_imgSource: VW Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine The Volkswagen Group has added South Korean battery cell manufacturer SK Innovation (SKI) to its stable of battery suppliers. SKI will supply the batteries for VW’s North American sales and a portion of the batteries for its European pure EVs.VW’s Roadmap E strategy calls for the Group to bring 50 new fully electric models to market by 2025. This will require battery capacity in excess of 150 GWh per year through 2025, which VW points out is equal to four times the annual capacity of Tesla’s Gigafactory.Along with SKI, the Volkswagen Group has chosen LG Chem and Samsung as battery partners for Europe – they’ll begin supplying batteries in 2019. SKI will cover VW’s battery demand in the North American market from 2022 on. VW has chosen Chinese battery giant CATL to supply batteries for the China market beginning in 2019.“With SK Innovation, LG Chem, Samsung and CATL, we have found strong partners for the long-term supply of cells for our electric vehicles,” said Board Member Stefan Sommer. “This lays the foundation for the transformation of the Volkswagen Group towards e-mobility.”last_img read more

Heres Whats Known Of Porsches Upcoming AllElectric SUV

first_img Porsche Cross Turismo Expected To Launch In 2021 It’s looking like Porsche will introduce its first pure-electric SUV in 2022, and here’s what we know so far.The all-electric Porsche Taycan is coming soon. Well, the plan is for it to go on sale in 2020. Following that effort, Porsche will release an all-new battery-electric SUV to compete with the Jaguar I-Pace. Apparently, the automaker is already in the development stages of its electric crossover, which will also work to compete with the Tesla Model X and Audi e-Tron, though the latter is under the same VW Group brand umbrella.Related Porsche Electric Content: Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 9, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Porsche To Offer Electric SUV, Tesla Roadster Rival Too According to a recent article by What Car?, the upcoming Porsche electric SUV will come standard with all-wheel drive by way of two electric motors. In its base configuration, it will churn out some 400bhp and have a real-world range of 250 miles or more. These numbers parallel that of its corporate cousin, the Audi e-Tron, which comes as no surprise. In addition, several variants will be available, with a top-of-the-line model pushing some 600bhp, but potentially less range.The SUV will follow in the footsteps of the current Macan, although it will be an all-new offering. Essentially, it will be a four-door crossover with seating for five people. It will be sized much like the Macan, but offer the cargo volume of the current Porsche Cayenne. Fortunately, the EV powertrain will allow for more available space due to the lack of a large internal combustion engine.Porsche already announced that it will offer an electrified variant of all of its vehicles by 2023, so this all-new SUV will have to be released ahead of that timeline if the brand is going to stay true to its word. Unless, of course, the automaker decides to come to market with another plug-in hybrid or traditional hybrid SUV by 2023.What Car? assumes the upcoming crossover will share similar pricing with the current Cayenne E-Hybrid.Source: What Car? Source: Electric Vehicle News Porsche Taycan Electric Range: Distance You Can Drive In 24 Hourslast_img read more

CATL FAW Group Set Up Battery Joint Venture

first_img CATL Delivered China’s Largest 100 MWh Battery Energy Storage CATL Signs Battery Venture Deal With Volvo Owner Geely The joint venture was founded at the end of January, involving a registered capital of RMB2 billion. CATL and FAW Group hold 51% and 49% stake in CATL-FAW with respective contribution of RMB1.02 billion and RMB980 million. The new joint venture’s business scope covers the development, production and sale of lithium ion battery, power battery, energy storage battery with ultra-large capacity and battery system as well as relevant after-sale services and technology consultation.Qu Tao, a board member of Dongfeng-CATL (Wuhan) Battery System Co.,Ltd, take the posts of chairman and general manager of CATL-FAW.CATL will invest 240 million euro in a battery factory near Erfurt, eastern Germany, said to start production in 2021 with an initial capacity of 14GWh per hour. The battery maker recently disclosed that capacity for its German factory will be expanded to 60GWh by 2026, according to recent reports.Up until now, CATL has built joint ventures with Geely, SAIC Motor, GAC Group and Dongfeng Motor. It also formed partnerships with such global automakers as BMW, Daimler, Groupe PSA, Volvo and Jaguar Land Rover, etc.Source: Gasgoo CATL just keeps on growing.China-based power battery provider Contemporary Amperex Technology Limited (CATL) and the state-owned carmaker FAW Group have set up a joint venture dubbed CATL-FAW Power Battery Company (CATL-FAW), according to tianyancha.com, a Chinese data search platform.More CATL News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 3, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News China’s CATL & Honda Sign Massive EV Battery Deal Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

The Fallacy That The FCPA Was Dormant For Decades

first_img FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. Learn More & Register More importantly, try telling the following approximate 80 individuals charged with FCPA violations between 1978 and 2003 that the FCPA was dormant. Their real lives, real careers, real reputations, and real pocketbooks were changed because of the supposedly dormant FCPA. There is a common narrative in certain circles that the FCPA was dormant for its first 20-25 years. Five minutes of simple research provides the following examples.The FCPA was passed in 1977 but “the statute effectively lay dormant for years.”“For over two decades the FCPA rested mostly dormant.”“First enacted in 1977 in a wave of post-Watergate anti-corruption sentiment, the FCPA had laid dormant and relatively forgotten until the early 2000s …”Most recently, a guest post on the FCPA Blog states: “[The FCPA] lay nearly dormant for pretty much a quarter of a century before it was picked up, dusted off and used by prosecutors.”Granted enforcement of the FCPA from its enactment until circa 2004 was generally less than enforcement since 2004 (for obvious practical reasons discussed at the end of this post). However, the narrative that the FCPA was dormant for nearly 20-25 years is a fallacy as highlighted in this post.Try telling the following approximate 40 business organizations charged with FCPA violations between 1978 and 2003 that the FCPA was dormant.Katy IndustriesPage AirwaysKenny InternationalInternational Systems & ControlsTesoro PetroleumInternational HarvesterCrawford EnterprisesRuston Gas TurbinesC.E. Miller Corp.Sam P. Wallace Inc.Applied Process Products OverseasW.S. Kirkpatrick Inc.Silicon ContractorsAshland OilGoodyear InternationalYoung & RubicamNapco InternationalHarris Corp.F.G. Mason EngineeringEagle Bus ManufacturingGeneral ElectricLockheed Corp.Vitusa Corp.MontedisonTriton EnergyControl Systems SpecialistSayboltMetcalf & EddyInternational Materials SolutionsIBMUNC / Lear ServicesSyncorChiquita Brands InternationalBaker HughesKPMG SiddhartaAmerican RiceBellSouthAmerican Bank Holographics, Inc Finbar KennyCharles MillerDonald CrawfordWilliam HallMario GonzalezRicardo BeltranAndres GarciaGeorge McLean (see here and here for a Q&A with McLean)Luis UriarteAl EysterJames SmithAlfonso RodriguezHarry CarpenterArthur KleinThomas SpangenbergSteven McKennaRichard LieboRobert GurinJoaquin PouJose GuaschJohn BlondekVernon TullJohn IacobucciRonald SchultzGeorge MortonDanny HerzbergSuleiman NassarAllen LoveDavid MeadFrerik PluimersDarrold CritesThomas QualeyDavid KayJoshua CantorDaniel RothrockRichard HalfordAlbert ReitzRobert KingPablo HernandezHerbert TannenbaumDouglas MurphyRamendra BasuGautam SenguptaRichard PitchfordJames GiffenHans BodmerClayton LewisThomas FarrellRobert ThomsonJames ReillyJames WilmotGerald WilmotDouglas JustonRoss ChapinJames LawlerRichard OlneyWallace CarrollMelvan JacobsJ. Thomas KenneallyHerman FrietschRaymond HofkerAlbert AnguloHarlan SteinRobert BucknerOrin AtikinsPhillip KeeverRichard McAdooDavid GoreRobert PuetzWilliam McClureRobert MurphyEric MattsonJames HarrisSonny HarsonoLawrence TheriotJoshua CantorJoseph SchwartzJoel MalebrancheAllen SturdivantGranted enforcement of the FCPA from its enactment until circa 2004 was generally less than enforcement since 2004. However, there are obvious practical reasons for this.More International BusinessThe FCPA is a law most logically implicated when doing business in international markets. In the FCPA’s modern era, business organizations (large and small and across a variety of industry sectors) are doing more business in international markets than ever before.More Companies and Individuals Subject to the FCPAAnother practical reason for the general increase in FCPA enforcement in the modern era is that more companies and individuals are subject to the FCPA than ever before.  Foreign companies with shares listed on U.S. exchanges are subject to the  books and records and internal controls provisions as well as the anti-bribery provisions to the extent a bribery scheme has a U.S. nexus.  When the FCPA was passed in 1977 and for many years thereafter, few foreign companies had shares listed on a U.S. exchange, but in the FCPA’s modern era approximately 1,000 foreign companies have shares listed on U.S. exchanges.  Indeed, most of the top FCPA enforcement actions in terms of settlement amounts have been against foreign companies.In addition, in 1998 the FCPA was amended resulting in certain other foreign companies and foreign nationals becoming subject to the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions to the extent a bribery scheme has a U.S. nexus.  Enforcement agencies have invoked this newest prong of the FCPA in bringing enforcement actions against, among others, companies from Korea, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, Russia and China, as well as citizens of Japan, the United Kingdom, and Israel.More Resolution VehiclesFor most of the FCPA’s history the DOJ had two choices when faced with conduct that might implicate the FCPA: prosecute or do not prosecute. (See here for a podcast with former FCPA Chief Joseph Covington).  In this new era, the additional options of NPAs and DPAs (and even more recently declinations with disgorgement) dominate FCPA enforcement and use of these alternative resolution vehicles is one of the more obvious reasons for the general upward trend in FCPA enforcement.  For instance, the former chief of the DOJ’s FCPA unit stated that if the DOJ did not have the option of resolving FCPA enforcement actions with NPAs or DPAs the DOJ “would certainly bring fewer cases.” Likewise, the OECD Report stated that “it seems quite clear that the use of these agreements is one of the reasons for the impressive FCPA enforcement record in the U.S.”Sarbanes OxleyThe passage of Sarbanes Oxley (“SOX”) in 2002 is also one of the practical reasons for the increase in FCPA enforcement.  Enacted in the aftermath of several corporate financial scandals, Section 404 of SOX (“Management of Assessment of Internal Controls”) requires issuers to assess and report on the effectiveness of its internal controls over financial reporting. Among other things, the SOX requirement caused issuers to more actively assess internal controls across its business operations particularly in foreign subsidiaries because such books and records are consolidated with the issuers for purposes of financial reporting. Such assessments have resulted in questionable payments or transactions being reported to corporate headquarters and SOX was specifically cited by the DOJ as one of the reasons for the increase in FCPA enforcement.  During a 2010 Senate FCPA hearing, a DOJ representative stated:“We are getting a significant number of disclosures from corporations about their own criminal conduct.  I think that, in part, relates to the passage of Sarbanes-Oxley legislation, which encourages corporations to review their own books and records.”Similarly, during a 2011 House FCPA hearing, the same DOJ representative stated:“At least one likely cause for this increase in cases is disclosures by companies consistent with their obligations under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which requires senior corporate officers to certify the accuracy of their financial statements.  This has led to more companies discovering FCPA violations and making the decision to disclose them to the SEC and DOJ.”ContextIn analyzing the general increase in enforcement in the modern era, context is also important. For instance, just two relatively newly invented enforcement theories have yielded approximately 30 corporate enforcement actions. Those two theories are the notion that individuals associated with certain foreign healthcare systems, such as physicians, are “foreign officials” and the notion that providing internships or jobs to family members of alleged “foreign officials” equates to bribery.Moreover, the following context is also important.Just a few unique historical events had a significant impact on FCPA enforcement statistics between 2007 and 2011.  The events were: (i) publication in 2005 of the so-called Volcker Report on the United Nations Iraq Oil for Food Program which served as a ready-made list of enforcement actions; (ii) in 2003, a former top official at French oil and gas company Technip shared information with French investigators concerning a $6 billion dollar project at Bonny Island, Nigeria; and (iii) several oil and gas companies utilized the services of Panalpina.The combined effect of just these three unique historical events resulted in 26 corporate enforcement actions (35% of all corporate enforcement actions and 55% of the settlement amounts during the time period 2007-2011).Other FactorsOther factors that have contributed to increased FCPA enforcement include foreign law enforcement cooperation, changes in technology and increased monitoring and reporting of business conduct by non-governmental organizations, civil society, and the media.last_img read more

Harbour Biomed and KelunBiotech collaborate to develop commercialize antiPDL1 antibody

first_imgAug 20 2018Harbour BioMed today announced it has entered into an exclusive strategic partnership with Sichuan Kelun-Biotech Biopharmaceutical Co., Ltd. (Kelun-Biotech) to develop and commercialize A167, an anti-PD-L1 antibody in Phase 2 clinical development, worldwide outside of the Greater China region. The companies will also collaborate in developing combination therapies of A167 with other agents for commercialization in their respective territories. The potential value of the partnership exceeds $350 million in addition to royalties.”Anti-PD-L1 therapy has been validated in many clinical trials in the Immuno-Oncology area. A167 has significant potential as a single agent and as the foundation for combination therapy with other innovative drugs. We are delighted to advance A167 globally and work closely with Kelun-Biotech to achieve its therapeutic potential,” said Dr. Jingsong Wang, Harbour BioMed’s founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “We plan to conduct A167-based combination trials globally by ourselves, including with innovative compounds we are developing, or in collaboration with our partners, to find better therapeutic options against a wide range of tumor types.” Dr. Wang noted that the partnership with Kelun-Biotech, Harbour’s first global development alliance, is an important step that accelerates our plan to build a highly innovative, clinical-stage portfolio for worldwide markets.”A167 is one of the important compounds in our portfolio,” said Dr. Tongtong Xue, Chief Executive Officer of Kelun-Biotech. “We are glad to enter this collaboration with Harbour BioMed which is based on trust in our partner’s capabilities and expertise. The Harbour team brings extensive global clinical development experience that will accelerate clinical trials with A167, especially in the area of combinational therapies.” Dr. Xue noted that the collaboration is the second alliance Kelun-Biotech entered with Harbour this year. “We entered a strategic partnership with Harbour to co-discover, co-develop and commercialize antibodies against innovative targets, based on Harbour’s leading fully human antibody discovery platforms. We have made significant progress in our joint discovery programs against multiple targets in oncology and immunological diseases.”Related StoriesAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemA167 is an immune-oncology investigational antibody developed by Kelun-Biotech. It binds to immune checkpoint protein PD-L1 and reactivate T cells in the body against cancer cells. The antibody has potential usage in a broad range of solid tumor and hematological malignancies in monotherapy and in combination with other agents. A167 is currently in multiple Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials in China targeting lymphoma and solid tumors.Under the agreement, Kelun-Biotech will receive upfront, development and regulatory milestones, and commercial milestones based on preset goals, with a potential value of more than $350 million, in addition to royalties based on annual net sales. Harbour will have exclusive rights to develop, manufacture and commercialize A167 in regions outside of Greater China. Both companies will share data generated from their own research and clinical trials to support mono and combination therapies of A167 with other agents for both parties’ development and registration.​ Source:http://www.harbourbiomed.com/en/newsContent.html#73last_img read more

Experts propose solutions to improve patient care for Parkinsons disease

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 10 2018Experts propose ways to address the rapidly rising number of deaths from Parkinson’s disease and related disorders and improve the end of life care of Parkinson patients in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease Deaths associated with Parkinson’s disease and related disorders increased substantially between 2001 and 2014. Parkinson’s disease was in fact the most common cause of death associated with a neurological condition, according to a report by Public Health England. International experts reporting in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease evaluate these findings and address important implications for future healthcare needs.The burden caused by Parkinson’s disease has increased alarmingly in recent years, taking the proportions of a true Parkinson “pandemic.” Over six and a half million individuals aged 20 years and over died in England between 2001 and 2014 according to the recent report by Public Health England. Of these, over 90,000 deaths were associated with a neurological condition. Parkinson’s disease was the most common individual neurological condition recorded on the death certificates as the underlying cause of death. Parkinson’s disease was the most common cause of death overall and accounted for 31% of deaths associated with a neurological condition as the underlying cause, the contributory cause, or both.Reviewing the report, a team of international experts led by Professor Bastiaan R. Bloem, MD, PhD; Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands explore the deeper relevance of the numbers and trends. “These statistics are important and should be used to inform and guide those who make long-term decisions about the practicalities of how Parkinson patients are managed by the various healthcare systems involved, working together to improve quality of care and quality of life,” comments Prof. Bloem.”There are several possible explanations for the increase in mortality associated with Parkinson’s disease. It is certainly in keeping with other recent reports that point to a striking rise in the incidence of new patients with Parkinson’s disease in the general population.”Related StoriesSmart phone health monitoring devices will revolutionize healthcareSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsApplication of machine learning methods to healthcare outcomes researchThe authors also highlight compelling data on the place of death, revealing that eight out of ten Parkinson patients die in hospitals or care homes. First author Sirwan Darweesh, MD, MSc, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA, emphasizes the tremendous importance of this finding: “Being able to die at home is a core wish of most patients with Parkinson’s disease; our current healthcare system is sometimes not able unable to meet this essential wish of patients and their families, particularly when medical issues requiring hospitalization occur.”The authors propose a number of solutions to improve the management of Parkinson patients in the community and raise standards of care in care homes and hospitals: A network of specifically trained healthcare professionals with specific expertise in Parkinson management A personalized, collaborative plan of care, not only for, but also with patients and their families Personal case managers for Parkinson patients Dedicated Parkinson nursing homes “Parkinson’s disease is a matter of serious concern for our future generations,” comments Prof. Bloem. “Future efforts should be focused on providing resources for vulnerable elderly Parkinson patients, avoiding unplanned hospital admissions and out-of-home deaths as much as possible.”The Public Health England report is “Deaths associated with neurological conditions in England 2001 to 2014,” issued by the National Neurology Intelligence Network, National End of Life Care Intelligence Network. It investigates the numbers and rates of deaths associated with neurological conditions and their recent trends; the demographic characteristics of people dying with neurological conditions; the underlying cause of death and association with the broad disease groups; and place of death. ​Source: https://www.iospress.nl/last_img read more

Top Stories Paternal Instinct Mammoth Graveyards and Big Brains

Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Parenting Rewires the Male BrainA study of gay and straight couples suggests that it’s not just women who have the so-called maternal instinct. Without a female caregiver around, the experience of hands-on parenting can change a father’s brain in the same way that pregnancy and childbirth do.E.U. Commission Rejects Plea to Block Stem Cell Research Funding Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The European Commission has turned down a request by pro-life organizations to block E.U. funding for research using embryonic stem cells—causing many scientists to breathe a sigh of relief. The commission says the existing rules under the European Union’s science program, Horizon 2020, are appropriate and will not change.Did Big Brains Sap Our Strength?A new study suggests that we humans paid a big price for being so smart. Over the course of our evolution, humans got weaker relative to other primates, trading brawns for our big—and energy-hungry—brains.Researcher Behind Stem Cell Controversy Agrees to RetractionEarlier this year, two papers reported that simply stressing adult cells could turn them into powerful stem cells called STAP (stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency) cells—and almost immediately drew accusations of plagiarism and image manipulation. Now, despite steadfastly defending her work, the lead author behind the papers has reportedly agreed to retract one of them.Did Dogs Help Drive Mammoths to Their Graves?Mammoth cemeteries—areas filled with thousands of mammoth bones—are dotted throughout central Europe and North Asia. Now, a new study argues that these mysterious graveyards were not the results of a natural catastrophe, but rather the work of early human hunters—who may have had help from some of the world’s first dogs. read more

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory hospital join forces to develop cancer drugs

first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The famed Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) on Long Island, New York, a bastion of basic biomedical research, is making a major foray into more applied drug development. Today the lab and North Shore-LIJ Health System, a local hospital system, announced a new alliance and a more than $120 million investment aimed at moving basic cancer discoveries into the clinic.The alliance does not mean that CSHL is moving away from basic research, says Bruce Stillman, CSHL CEO and President. “Our discovery science has placed us as one of the leading research institutions in the world,” and “I want to keep it at that level,” he says. But the lab also wants to turn those discoveries into drugs. It found an “ideal marriage” with North Shore-LIJ, which has 16,000 new cancer patients each year in the New York City area and wanted to expand its academic clinical research, he says. “This will provide a substantial amount of funding to do the translational cancer research that we have been doing on a shoestring budget,” Stillman says.The not-for profit CSHL, which turns 125 this year, has a $145 million budget and 600 researchers and technical staff who study cancer, neuroscience, plant biology, and quantitative biology. The lab has long had a National Cancer Institute–designated Cancer Center where work using genomics, RNAi screens, and mouse models has yielded important cancer drug targets. But until now the lab has relied largely on pharmaceutical companies to develop those findings into treatments. “This will take it to a different level” with the alliance’s researchers validating targets, developing protocols, and conducting early stage clinical trials, Stillman says. However, “we’re not pretending we’re going to become a full-service pharmaceutical company,” Stillman says. The lab expects to use outside contracting research organizations for steps such as screening small molecules and conducting medical chemistry.North Shore-LIJ will recruit a new head for its cancer institute, who will also be on the faculty of CSHL. The lab also plans to hire more clinician-scientists like David Tuveson, a pancreatic cancer researcher recruited 4 years ago from the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute in the United Kingdom, who is now deputy director of CSHL’s Cancer Center. Tuveson and Stillman say the new venture aims to emulate the Institute of Cancer Research in London, where basic and clinical researchers worked together on the early development of drugs such as PARP inhibitors, which target cancers with defects in DNA repair, and abiraterone, used to treat prostate cancer. “The idea is to take our scientific approach into early stage clinical studies,” an area that is not well supported by either federal funding or drug companies, Tuveson says.The two partners are not disclosing the source of the initial $120 million. But Stillman notes that private donors and foundations contributed $22 million for a preclinical therapeutics development facility that CSHL began building in 2013.Stillman says the new venture will not compromise CSHL’s basic research. Despite more than a decade of flat budgets at the National Institutes of Health, CSHL’s federal funding is up and the lab is two-thirds of the way toward a goal of raising $250 million largely for its endowment to support basic research. Nor does the lab have any plans to trim its meetings and courses program that hosts gatherings such as The Biology of Genomes, one of the genomics field’s most important meetings. “Cold Spring Harbor’s identity is not going to change,” Stillman says.*Correction, 2 April, 1:25 p.m.: David Tuveson’s previous affiliation has been corrected.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Midnight karaoke snake hallucinations paranoia and exhaustion Meet the scientists who work

first_imgMidnight karaoke, snake hallucinations, paranoia, and exhaustion: Meet the scientists who work the night shift Amy Cooper Polar scientists also struggle with another facet of winter life. Many outdoor polar experiments require absolute darkness, and residents at the bases must cover their windows to prevent light from leaking out. “So you’re in a box all the time,” Van Rossem says. “I really missed being able to look out the window.”John Parker, a medical doctor at the Australian Antarctic base at Davis, agrees. “When you’re not looking out the window, your perspective of life changes,” he says. “Small things become much larger.” He called it mental “myopia,” and in a detail worthy of Edgar Allan Poe, even found himself growing paranoid in the endless nighttime: “I’d lose something and think, ‘Someone’s taken it!’ A bit of suspicion comes in.” Other scientists who worked overnight shifts elsewhere reported similar, if subtler, mood swings, growing more irritable and snappy with colleagues.Despite these rough patches, Parker appreciated his months-long night shift in Antarctica, calling it an adventure. Activities like dart nights and costume parties helped defuse tension, and the 16-person team held a barbecue in September to welcome the sun back. “It was cloudy, so we didn’t see anything,” he laughs, “but it was a special event.” He’d definitely overwinter there again—following a suitable break. “Maybe after having some fresh fruit.”Many scientists who work at night share Parker’s sentiments: It was miserable, and I loved it. Some savored the profound quiet, or a perfect sunrise, or shimmering green aurorae on white snow. Some learned to appreciate different tenors of darkness—the relatively bright desert sky at night versus caves and undercanopies so black that opening or closing your eyes makes no difference. If nothing else, some enjoyed binge-watching movies or catching up on neglected work. This past winter in Antarctica, Parker completed a memoir about several humanitarian medical missions he’s served on. “And I can say I wrote my book in 1 night,” he adds.As they age, many nocturnal scientists find that their capacity for night work has diminished. Yet they still relish the chance to connect more deeply with some beloved species or natural wonder, and somehow the sacrifice and discomfort of night work makes it all the more special.Sergio Speziale, a mineral physicist at the German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam, has pulled many a long night at synchrotrons and other particle accelerators around the world, and his time served has left him feeling philosophical.“Repeated night shifts tend to amplify the effect of whatever happens,” he says. “If things are really cool and interesting, there’s a more euphoric approach to discovery. When things fall apart, the sadness is amplified, too. Working nights will always remain in my mind. It’s sometimes good to experience that in life.”If you’re interested in learning more about circadian rhythms then listen to our podcast interview with author Sam Kean and check out related research. By Sam KeanNov. 23, 2016 , 9:00 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The challenges faced by researchers on the night shift vary significantly by discipline. Biologists, for instance, sometimes upend their whole lives to match the nondiurnal schedules of certain plants and animals.Nicky Creux, a postdoc at the University of California (UC), Davis, studies sunflowers, whose buds open up just before dawn. That means getting up at 3:30 a.m. for weeklong stretches to set up cameras and dissecting equipment, in order to track the minute-by-minute emergence and growth of anthers and styles, plant reproductive organs. Although she’s naturally a morning lark, “Cycling out to the fields in the dark is pretty miserable,” she laughs. At the end of one recent 6-day stretch, her fine motor skills basically broke down from exhaustion: She kept dropping the tiny flower parts and losing them in the grass. She’s hoping the lost data won’t submarine the whole week.Creux’s social life suffered as well, because she essentially lived those weeks in a different time zone from everyone around her. “Friends want to go to dinner and I can’t,” she says. “I have to be in bed by 8 p.m.” She also found it hard to abandon the lab to rest while others nearby were still hard at work. “As a scientist, you’re used to working 12-hour shifts, and staying until 7 p.m. I had to get my head around the fact that it’s okay to go home at 3.” Alfano says that like traditional night workers, such as hospital staff, janitors, and truckers, scientists can feel tempted to “cheat” and attend daytime events with friends and family. That can compromise an already spotty sleep schedule. “At some point, you’re really pushing the limit of what your sleep-wake system can do,” she says.Beyond the strange hours, nocturnal biologists often work in environments that can prove dangerous to human beings, who lack the dim light vision and sharp senses of smell or hearing that most night-adapted species rely on. Hong Young Yan, a fish and frog biologist at the Taiwan National Academy of Science in Taipei, was tramping along a dark trail at night once when a colleague went tumbling down a 30-meter embankment. “Suddenly, he just disappeared,” Yan says. The colleague lived, but sprained an ankle and cried with pain as he limped back to camp. Another time, Yan walked smack into a beehive in the dark, and the colony erupted. “We had to run and jump into a stream” to dodge the swarm, he says.To help his students overcome their fear of the dark, Medellín performs a little hazing ritual, which involves creeping up behind them in a jaguar mask. He gets a lot of screams. “Some might call it a bit of abuse,” Medellín says, but he argues that maintaining a calm demeanor is essential when you dwell among the bats or other nocturnal animals: “The dark is much more comfortable, if you accept it.” Bat biologist Rodrigo Medelin says, “The dark is much more comfortable if you accept it.” Stephan Richter, IceCube/NSF Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country And yet, few of the nocturnal researchers Science talked to would give up their work. Amid the misery and exhaustion, science after hours can still produce moments of serenity, even euphoria. “Either you’re getting to know more about the natural world, or you’re getting to know more about yourself,” Medellín says. “It’s always a source of happiness to me.”center_img The IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole attracts a special breed of scientists who can withstand the months-long days or nights. Email All Rodrigo Medellín wanted was a nap. A biologist at the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mexico City, he had been trapping bats for several nights in a row in the Lacandon rainforest near Guatemala, and was exhausted. “So I lay on the ground,” he says, and blithely fell asleep. Forty winks later, he awoke uneasily. One of the deadliest snakes in Mexico, a tawny fer-de-lance, was slithering by his head, 30 centimeters away. “I did not move and let her pass,” he recalls.Even after the coast cleared and he set about his bat hunt again, fear wouldn’t loosen its grip on his sleep-deprived mind. That entire night, “I kept hallucinating more snakes,” he says. Every twitching shadow concealed another serpent, every rustling leaf had fangs. Although a veteran of the night shift, Medellín greeted that dawn frazzled.Working nights is unavoidable, or at least commonplace, in certain scientific fields. If you want to study bat behavior or stellar nebulae or sleep physiology, you may have to become half-nocturnal yourself, and scientists who sign up for the night shift encounter problems that just don’t arise during the day. They tumble down embankments in the pitch black, nod off midexperiment, and grow paranoid in the witching hours. It’s a tough gig, and for these and other reasons psychologists and sleep experts take a dim view of night work, which can disrupt sleep, throw hormones out of whack, and make you measurably dumber. “Human beings are meant to be regulated by light,” says Candice Alfano, a psychologist at the University of Houston in Texas who’s leading a study for NASA that includes a focus on circadian rhythm disruptions. “We still have that biology, even though our social culture has changed dramatically.” Unlike biologists, astronomers usually moonlight indoors, in relative comfort. But being sedentary has its own downside: drowsiness.Brent Miszalski, an astronomer in Cape Town who observes at the South African Astronomical Observatory in Sutherland, recalled one night during a multiweek telescope run when he helped clean up after a pipe burst. “I didn’t do anything particularly strenuous,” he says, “but the physical work, combined with the exhaustion, meant that when I had to start observing again, I fell asleep in the chair.” He’s far from alone.Drowsiness hits regulars on the night shift for two reasons. First, night work violates our body’s expectations about when to sleep and when to remain alert. Second, compensatory daytime sleep usually stinks. Exposure to sunlight prevents the brain from producing melatonin and other natural soporifics. As a result, people sleep fewer hours, and less deeply, during the day. Alfano likens the overall feeling to chronic jet lag.The poor sleep experienced by night workers also has knock-on effects. It can raise blood pressure and alter levels of hormones, such as ghrelin and leptin, that affect appetite and satiety. As a result, “People tend to snack through night shifts instead of sitting down to eat meals, and those snacks are often quite unhealthy,” says Philip Tucker, a psychologist at Swansea University in the United Kingdom who studies shift workers. Not surprisingly, longtime night shift workers suffer from obesity and other conditions such as cardiovascular disease at rates up to double that of daytime workers.No studies specifically examine whether scientists on the night shift suffer those problems. And most researchers don’t work at night for months or years at a stretch. Indeed, there’s a trend nowadays toward less night work. Computer technology has automated many tasks, and many observatories and particle accelerators have dedicated technicians to run the complex instruments. Astronomers, for example, can observe the sky remotely by requesting a series of observations and simply waiting for the results, without having to travel and turn their daily routine upside down.Still, night shifts remain a tradition and even a badge of honor in many fields, and the on/off schedules at such facilities—at Miszalski’s observatory, most astronomers work a “night week” each month—can be physically grueling. “It’s the worst of both worlds,” Tucker says. “A week [at night] definitely disrupts the body clock. But by the time you get to the end, and are approaching adjustment, you go back” to daytime hours, wiping you out all over again. In order to minimize such disruptions, Miszalski prefers working 2-week-long observation shifts every few months. Repeated night shifts tend to amplify the effect of whatever happens. If things are really cool and interesting, there’s a more euphoric approach to discovery. When things fall apart, the sadness is amplified, too. Working nights will always remain in my mind. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The toll on the body can impair the mind as well. Night work may slow down mental processing, shorten attention span, and leave people feeling unmotivated. NASA scientist-astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson, who studied gas chemistry in orbit, had to endure several “slam-shifts” during her two tours on the International Space Station. These consisted of a full day’s work, a “silly 2-hour nap,” she says, and another immediate shift, usually to coordinate with ground crews in Russia. During such shifts, Dyson and other astronauts occasionally took computer tests to measure mental sharpness—matching patterns, or adding up strings of small numbers. The results were clear, she says: “We’re kidding ourselves to think we’re at our best when sleep is compromised.”Astronomer Vivian U, a postdoc at UC Riverside, once tried writing a paper overnight at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, where the 4267-meter elevation can exacerbate the mental loopiness caused by an extended stint of night work. Feeling inspired, she crafted a brilliant analogy about the similarities between the formation of galaxies and apples falling from trees. The next morning she realized it was gibberish.All joking aside, night shift–induced mental fogginess does increase the odds of mishaps. Overnight workers contributed in small but significant ways to the accidents at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania and Chernobyl in Ukraine as well as the Challenger space shuttle explosion. Several studies have found that medical staff working daylong, or longer, shifts make more errors (e.g., misreading electrocardiogram outputs, giving the wrong medication) when chronically deprived of sleep. Nor does the danger stop at work. Studies of doctors and nurses on night shifts found them twice as likely to get in wrecks or nod off behind the wheel on the drive home.Some facilities have informal rules to save scientists from somnolent stupidity. “I was told to never send an email from the control room at night,” says Lizette Guzman-Ramirez, an astronomer at Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands. “You get up and read it the next morning, and it doesn’t make any sense.” Similarly, some nocturnal scientists have developed tricks to stay alert at 3 a.m. Miszalski and his co-workers have “nonsense conversations” or even “make animal noises” to perk up. When Guzman-Ramirez worked a few 14-hour nights by herself at a telescope in South Africa, she belted out pop songs at the top of her lungs. “I remember singing a lot of ‘Torn,’ by Natalie Imbruglia,” she says. “It was my go-to karaoke song, and I perfected it.”If 14-hour overnight shifts sound bad, then pity poor polar scientists. During the polar winter they often endure several months without sunlight—the ultimate night shift. Not surprisingly, polar stations attract night owls. “I’ve always had this loathing for sunrise, because I knew I should be in bed already,” says Mack van Rossem, a physicist at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. But without a sunrise to cap his all-nighters during the winter, Van Rossem found himself drifting through 32-hour “days,” where he’d sleep for 10 hours at once and work for 22. Now that the sun has risen for the year—it poked its head over the horizon in mid-September and won’t set again for months—he’s had trouble sleeping, logging 6 hours a night at most. “It definitely takes me a few hours to get going now,” he says.Watch: What happens when we stay up all night? Sergio Speziale, mineral physicist, German Research Centre for Geosciences last_img read more

Weird vibrations poised to control quantum computers

first_img Weird vibrations poised to control quantum computers To control or read out a superconducting qubit, researchers make it interact with a microwave resonator—typically a strip of metal on the qubit chip or a finger-size cavity surrounding it—which rings with microwave photons the way an organ pipe rings with sound. By adjusting the energy of the qubit, researchers can shuttle its quantum states into the resonator, so that a zero-and-one state of the qubit can be stored as a state of the resonator in which a photon is both present and absent. But some physicists see advantages to replacing the microwave resonator with a mechanical one that rings with quantized vibrations, or phonons.That effort may seem daft, as such vibrations constitute heat, which obliterates delicate quantum states. But when working at temperatures near absolute zero, a well-designed acoustic resonator could ring longer than a microwave one does, enabling it to act as a sort of quantum memory, says Robert Schoelkopf, a physicist at Yale University. The vibrations also have wavelengths less than a thousandth as long as microwaves of the same frequency, so the resonators can be far more compact, he says.First, physicists must learn to control quantum vibrations. They took a first step in 2010, when Cleland, then at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), siphoned every phonon out of an oscillating cantilever etched from aluminum nitride, leaving it in its least energetic quantum ground state. However, that simple quantum state persisted for just 5 nanoseconds, too little time to put the device into more complex quantum states of motion.To push further, several groups are manipulating ripples called surface acoustic waves (SAWs), which travel along a material’s surface. On top of a microchip, the researchers etch two gratings of metal stripes just micrometers apart. In the gap between the gratings, the researchers trigger a wave by applying a voltage to a comb-shaped device called a transducer, which causes the material to contract. The gratings act as mirrors, reflecting SAWs of particular wavelengths back and forth so that they resonate in the gap. And by connecting the transducer to a superconducting qubit, researchers link its quantum state to the SAWs.Using that approach, Cleland and Kevin Satzinger, a UCSB graduate student, fashioned a resonator on a lithium niobate chip that rang for up to 150 nanoseconds. They showed they could create any desired combination of zero and one phonons in the resonator, Satzinger told the meeting. “We can watch the energy going back and forth” between qubit and cavity, he says.Researchers in Schoelkopf’s group are focusing not on waves trapped on a chip’s surface, but on vibrations traveling through the chip’s bulk material. They exploit vibrations that can bounce between the upper and lower surfaces of the half-millimeter-thick chip beneath their qubit.Using that geometry, the researchers kept vibrations in their sapphire chip ringing for up to 60 microseconds, Yale’s Yiwen Chu told the meeting. Moreover, the researchers could feed up to seven quanta of vibration one by one into the resonator, she reported. Making more complex quantum states is “really the next step,” Chu says. For example, she says, they might try to put the resonator into a Schrödinger cat state, in which it would contain a macroscopic sound wave, comprising many vibrational quanta, and at the same time be devoid of vibrations.Acoustic resonators could offer more flexibility in quantum circuit designs. In some circuits, multiple qubits are linked to the same microwave resonator, which acts as a conduit for the qubit interactions. But most microwave cavities can only host photons of a single frequency. In that case, all the qubits must interact with one another in an interconnected tangle, says Konrad Lehnert, a physicist at JILA, an institute run jointly by the University of Colorado in Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.In contrast, acoustic resonators can enable qubits to interact with vibrations of a few different, closely spaced frequencies. That should make it possible to tailor the interactions among the qubits, so that, for example, only nearest neighbors interact—desirable for modeling certain abstract quantum systems, Lehnert says. He and his colleagues have taken a step toward such control, JILA’s Bradley Moores told the meeting, by showing that they could simultaneously couple a single qubit to SAWs of several frequencies.Quantum acoustics might also help solve a major problem for emerging quantum technologies. Microwave cables can shuttle information within a quantum computer. To move it to other experiments or distant locations, however, those signals will likely need to be converted from microwaves to optical photons, which can travel great distances in optical fibers. Acoustic waves rippling at microwave frequencies have wavelengths similar to those of optical photons. So in principle, they could serve as a bridge to translate between the two, researchers say, although nobody yet knows exactly how to do it.Acoustic resonators might even test the bounds of the quantum realm. Quantum theory allows tiny things like atoms or photons to be in two places at once, but nobody has ever seen such behavior in a macroscopic material object. Some theorists argue that a yet-unknown principle, perhaps involving gravity, would prevent it from happening for large objects. But Chu says it might be possible to make her group’s sapphire chip simultaneously vibrate in opposite directions. That would put tens of micrograms of material in two slightly different places at the same time—and test whether quantum weirdness extends almost to the human scale. “You don’t know until you try.” Micrometer-size acoustic resonators (orange) trap vibrations that can control quantum bits. By Adrian ChoMar. 14, 2018 , 3:00 PM Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img KEVIN SATZINGER, CLELAND LAB, UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA—For the moment, microwave photons are the keys to many quantum computers: Physicists use them to program, read out, and otherwise manipulate the machines’ quantum bits. But microwave technology is bulky, and its quantum states don’t last very long. Now, several groups are exploring a new way to talk to a quantum computer: with tiny vibrations, normally carriers of pesky heat and noise.The budding discipline of quantum acoustics could shake up embryonic quantum computers by miniaturizing technologies and producing longer-lasting quantum memories. “We’re right on the cusp” of controlling quantum vibrations, says Andrew Cleland, a physicist at the University of Chicago in Illinois, whose group presented its latest work last week here at the annual March meeting of the American Physical Society.Whereas an ordinary computer flips bits that can be set to either zero or one, a quantum computer uses qubits that can be set to zero, one, or, bizarrely, zero and one at the same time—potentially enabling huge boosts in speed. Companies such as Google and IBM are racing to demonstrate the superiority of quantum computers for certain tasks, and many are betting on qubits made of superconducting metal circuits on chips. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

US think tank shuts down prominent center that challenged climate science

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Read more… U.S. think tank shuts down prominent center that challenged climate science Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Originally published by E&E NewsThe Cato Institute in Washington, D.C., quietly shut down a program that for years sought to raise uncertainty about climate science, leaving the libertarian think tank co-founded by Charles Koch without an office dedicated to global warming.The move came after Pat Michaels, a climate scientist who rejects mainstream researchers’ concerns about rising temperatures, left Cato earlier this year amid disagreements with officials in the organization. The Cato Institute headquarters in Washington, D.C. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe “They informed me that they didn’t think their vision of a think tank was in the science business, and so I said, ‘OK, bye,’” Michaels said in an interview yesterday. “There had been some controversy going around the building for some time, so things got to a situation where they didn’t work out.”A spokeswoman said Cato’s shuttering of the Center for the Study of Science does not represent a shift in the institute’s position on human-caused climate change. But the think tank moved decisively to close down the science wing that was overseen by Michaels. Ryan Maue, a meteorologist and former adjunct scholar, also left the center.“While it is true that, with the departure of Pat Michaels, we have deactivated our Center for the Study of Science, we continue to work on science policy issues,” Khristine Brookes, the spokeswomen, wrote in an email. She didn’t mention climate change.Michaels is among a small number of academics with legitimate climate science credentials who downplay the human contribution to rising temperatures. He is a frequent guest on Fox News and other conservative outlets, and he has spent years attacking efforts to address climate change. He was influential in the administration of President George H.W. Bush, and he helped turn the GOP away from climate policy at a time when conservatives were embracing it (Climatewire, Dec. 5, 2018). That shift has endured.Cato also is no longer affiliated with Richard Lindzen, an emeritus professor of meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who has long been critical of established climate science. Lindzen was a distinguished fellow at the think tank. It’s unclear when he left Cato, and Brookes declined to comment on personnel issues.Maue, who worked with Michaels, said other think tanks cultivated closer relationships with the Trump White House.“In terms of climate change and regulation, Cato was not a big player at all in the Trump administration,” he said.Michaels was not asked to take part in the White House plan for an “adversarial” review of climate science related to the National Climate Assessment. Michaels has been critical of government climate reports for decades and has published research in major scientific journals. Both of those are seen as attributes by recruiters in charge of finding experts for the White House panel.Michaels has spent years attacking climate modeling, which he claims ran hot, despite evidence from NASA that contradicted his claims and demonstrated that models were largely accurate. He has also portrayed academic researchers in climate-related fields as beholden to funding that incentivizes them to produce alarming research. The Cato Institute has received millions of dollars from the Koch network, the Mercer Family Foundation, Exxon Mobil Corp. and other foundations that oppose regulations.Maue said the Niskanen Center, which was founded by Cato alumnus Jerry Taylor, has attracted conservative followers with its middle-of-the-road climate policy. That’s appealing to businesses that help fund think tanks and to those that might support policy positions on climate in the post-Trump era, he said.“That’s attractive to business and politicians who don’t really want to see the climate flame wars continuing on,” Maue said in an interview. “I think many businesses have taken an approach to what’s going to happen and, assuming Trump isn’t around in 2021, what’s coming down the pike.”Still, Maue said that one of Michaels’ lasting contributions in the climate policy debate was to create a position where one can accept that humans are affecting the climate but not as much as the vast majority of scientists claim. It’s now a de facto position for many Republican lawmakers who acknowledge that humans are contributing to climate change but don’t want to restrict fossil fuel use.“Where Pat’s influence is is in the term ‘lukewarming,’” Maue said. “Lukewarming is not climate denial; it’s just that he’s taking, and most of us on this side of the issue believe in lower climate sensitivity. We don’t believe there’s going to be 5 degrees of warming; we figure it’s at the lower end of 1.5 degrees.”The vast majority of climate scientists believe that the world could warm 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels within the next two decades and accelerate through the end of the century, with some estimates placing warming above 5°C.Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2019. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net Email By Scott Waldman, E&E NewsMay. 29, 2019 , 2:45 PM B. Christopher/Alamy Stock Photo last_img read more

Mysterious Poe Toaster left Booze and Roses at Edgar Allan Poes Grave

first_imgThe life and death of Edgar Allan Poe are just as mysterious as his tales. Whether people wanted to present the American writer as a dark and enigmatic character or things just occurred obscurely, no one can tell. If not puzzling, the events surrounding Poe’s death were at least inexplicable. Poe died on October 7, 1849. At his funeral, there were only seven people. He was buried in an unmarked grave on his grandfather’s plot in Westminster Burying Grounds, Baltimore.26 years after his death, teachers and students raised money to pay for a proper monument, and Poe’s remains were moved next to the cemetery gate.Portrait of Poe by William Abbot Pratt from September 1849, a month before his death.Hundreds of people from all over the world visit Poe’s grave. To this day, many people, fans of his literature, honor Poe’s legacy in various unique ways. However, nobody pays their respects to the dead poet as did the Poe Toaster.On 19 January, 1949, E.A. Poe’s birthday a hundred years after his death, a stranger approached the gravestone of the writer. It was dawn, and the mysterious man was dressed all in black, with a white scarf and wide-brimmed black hat.Original burial spot of Edgar Allan Poe in Westminster Burial Ground in Baltimore. Photo by JefferyGoldman CC BY-SA 4.0He placed three red roses and a note on the grave, poured himself a glass of cognac, recited a brief toast, and after leaving the half-empty bottle of cognac next to the roses, the stranger left.The next year, the stranger showed up again, performed his short ritual, and left the scene. He went on repeating the same ritual on 19 January for 70 years. He remained anonymous and was called the “Poe Toaster” due to his celebration toast for Poe’s birthday.1848 “Ultima Thule” daguerreotype of Poe, probably made by Edwin H. Manchester at the Samuel Masury and Samuel W. Hartshorn photo studio in Providence R.I.He never got unmasked but was observed by the small audience that gathered each year to celebrate the day. People wondered who that person might be and if he was somehow mysteriously related to the writer.Although many tried to identify the Poe Toaster, he (or she) managed to escape before being photographed.Cognac and roses found at Poe’s present-day (post-1875) grave on January 19, 2008, likely left by an imitator. Photo By Midnightdreary CC By 3.0There is only one, obscure but actual photo of Poe Toaster, taken in 1990 and published in Life Magazine. There have been many theories about the identity of the mysterious admirer, but nobody ever came up with a fact. While the stranger admired Poe, he acquired his own followers, who admired the Poe Toaster.Kat Eschner writes for Smithsonian that ever since 1977, the crowd that gathered at Poe’s gravestone to celebrate his birthday included the now-former curator of Poe House, Jeff Jerome. Over the years, he became the keeper of the notes left by the Toaster. Jerome became one of the Toaster’s followers, every year, eagerly waiting for the note.Edgar Allan Poe.In 1999, Jerome took the Toaster’s note saying: “the torch had been passed.” And the Toaster died. It has been assumed he passed the tradition to his sons or another literary fan, but as Bob McMillan of the Herald-Citizen writes: “But things were different. The sons didn’t always take the tradition as seriously as their father. Sometimes the Toaster showed up in street clothes. Sometimes notes were left that were completely off target, and a disappointed Jerome withheld them, simply telling the crowd that the Toaster had come and gone.”Edgar Allan Poe is buried at Westminster Hall in Baltimore, Maryland.The Edgar Allan Poe Society wrote once that cognac was never mentioned in any of the writer’s works. Therefore, everyone was even more puzzled why the Toaster preferred the beverage to make the toast. Some people gave the simplest explanation that the stranger might have simply liked cognac.In January 2009, on the 200th birthday of Poe, the Toaster didn’t show up. For the first time in 70 years, there was no toast on Poe’s gravestone. No note. Not a sign of the stranger. Everyone was disappointed.And then, the Toaster came back on Poe’s birthday celebration in 2016. The Maryland Historical Society resurrected the tradition. The society chose a person to show up at dawn at the graveyard and perform the famous ritual.Read another story from us: Nevermore…The Unanswered Questions Surrounding the Final Days of Edgar Allan PoeHowever, although the “imposter” was dressed the same and held the same ceremony, the mystery was missing from the act. He wasn’t anonymous, and the event was a public celebration. We still don’t have any clues to the identity of the original Poe’s Toaster.last_img read more

Smugglers hurl bombs near IndoBangladesh border BSF man loses hand

first_img Post Comment(s) Constable Anisur Rehman was attacked with bombs twice. He retaliated with a non-lethal PAG gun when the smugglers were hurling bombs at him near the Angrail border post in the North 24 Parganas district around 3:30 am.According to a BSF officer, a group of cattle smugglers had entered 200 metres inside the Indian side to smuggle cattle into Bangladesh.“The smugglers were equipped with sharp weapons and bombs. Rehman fired from his non-lethal gun and they attacked him with two bombs. He suffered pellet injuries to his legs, lungs and stomach due to the impact of bombs. They then hurled another bomb which directly hit his right hand,” said a BSF officer. Advertising Advertising By Express News Service |Kolkata | Published: July 12, 2019 4:03:20 am BSF recruitment 2019: Last day to apply for 1072 head constable vacancies tomorrow West Bengal: BSF steps up vigil after jawan injured in smugglers’ attack; 150 bovines seized J&K: Suspected Pakistani intruder shot dead by BSF personnel bsf jawan kills self in tripura, bsf jawan commits suicide in tripura, bsf jawan on shooting spree in tripura, tripura news Constable Anisur Rehman was attacked with bombs twice. He retaliated with a non-lethal PAG gun when the smugglers were hurling bombs at him (Representational)A Border Security Force (BSF) constable lost his right hand and was severely injured while trying to intercept a group of 25 cattle smugglers in Bangoan near Indo-Bangladesh border early on Thursday. The jawan suffered grievous injuries and he fell unconscious. Reinforcement troops controlled the situation. The smugglers, however, escaped to the other side taking advantage of darkness and tall grass.“The BSF has directed all its formations in the south Bengal frontier area to adopt an aggressive posture against trans-border criminals and thwart their sinister designs. Such attacks on BSF troops are taking place quite often,” read a BSF statement.A smuggler is also suspected to have been injured in the firing by the jawan, a senior official told PTI.On Wednesday, the border guarding force had repulsed an attack by about 200 Bangladeshi cattle smugglers and seized 107 buffaloes along the Indo-Bangla border in Murshidabad district of the state. Related News last_img read more

Beijings message to Hong Kong Get in line or face irrelevance

first_img Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence State broadcaster China Central Television aired footage Tuesday of Lam denouncing the demonstrators and video of police riding in to secure the building. A website run by the Communist Party’s nationalist Global Times said the chaos “disrupted public order and challenges the rule of law.”It’s a narrative that challenges some of China’s external critics, leading to an usually public war of words with the U.K., which has usually prioritized smooth relations with Beijing since returning Hong Kong. Prime Minister Theresa May told Parliament she was “shocked” by the scenes of violence and, after Chinese Ambassador to London Liu Xiaoming accused the British government of meddling, summoned him to the Foreign Office to explain.U.K. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt urged Chinese President Xi Jinping to “let it be” and not apply new pressure to Hong Kong, while his rival to succeed May as Conservative Party leader, former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, told Reuters that he stood with the city’s residents “every inch of the way.”“The U.K. government chose to stand on the wrong side, it has made inappropriate remarks, not only to interfere in the internal affairs of Hong Kong but also to back up the violent lawbreakers,” Liu said in a televised statement Wednesday. He also said Britain has tried to “obstruct” Hong Kong authorities from “bringing the criminals to justice, which is utter interference in Hong Kong’s rule of law.” The Chinese government has taken a increasingly firm line against both perceived meddling and the more radical protesters. The foreign ministry and the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office have denounced the protesters who stormed the legislature as “extremists.”On Tuesday, Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang described Western criticisms as “an ugly act of hypocrisy” while warning countries to choose their words and actions carefully. From the outset of the protests, Beijing has obliquely hinted at the role of “foreign interference” in instigating unrest.In the long run, “it is hard to see a happy ending to this impasse,” Simon Pritchard, global research director at Gavekal, wrote in a note. Hong Kong tourism, hotel occupancy falls as protests drag on Hong Kong protesters, police clash as demonstrations target Chinese traders Advertising Chinese state media blames 'Western ideologues' for Hong Kong protests Thousands of people demonstrate peacefully outside City Hall in Hong Kong (Lam Yik Fei/The New York Times)After a week of turbulence in Hong Kong, Beijing appears to have settled on its message to the city: continued protests risk throwing away everything that makes it special. More Explained Historic protests erupted in recent months over Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s decision to push ahead with a controversial bill that would allow extraditions to the mainland, alarming locals and spooking the local business community. The ransacking of the legislature came on the anniversary of the 1997 handover, as tens of thousands of people marched peacefully in a separate annual protest that passed near the complex.On Wednesday, Hong Kong-based broadcaster TVB said police arrested at least 13 people in relation to the occupation of the complex. Dozens more suspects had been identified and a wave of further arrests was expected in “the near future,” The South China Morning Post newspaper reported Thursday, citing unidentified people in law enforcement.“The protesters now risk losing the moral high ground. This could be a turning point,” said Wang Huiyao, an adviser to China’s cabinet and founder of the Center for China and Globalization. “The violence could destroy their credibility, and it will be hard for anyone in the West to defend. They will also alienate people who supported the movement.” Demonstrators march past the U.S. Consulate in Hong Kong (Lam Yik Fei/The New York Times)Party Narrative Advertising By Bloomberg | Published: July 4, 2019 10:08:02 am Clashes break out as Hong Kong protesters escalate fight in suburbs After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan A front-page editorial in the Communist Party’s flagship newspaper, the People’s Daily, blasted the protesters who stormed the city’s Legislative Council on Monday as “extremists” whose actions threaten to hinder economic and social development and “ruin Hong Kong’s reputation as an international business metropolis.”The comments play into a widespread anxiety among Hong Kong residents: that the former British colony risks irrelevance as it is swallowed up by an increasingly wealthy and powerful China. Beijing is using this week’s unrest to put its own spin on events, sending protesters the message that their actions are more likely to speed up than slow down that trend.State media has presented Hong Kong as a city on the brink. “As the global economic landscape undergoes profound adjustments and international competition becomes increasingly fierce, Hong Kong faces great challenges and cannot afford flux or internal attrition,” the People’s Daily said. Taking stock of monsoon rain “On the Hong Kong side, the student holidays will end and the pragmatism that characterizes most of the population may persuade all but a hard core of protesters to back away,” Pritchard said. “If something like this does play out, it will be a fragile truce until the next big challenge to Hong Kong’s way of life comes around.” Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Best Of Express Post Comment(s) Related News Advertisinglast_img read more

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