Carwiz has expanded to two new destinations in Southeast and Western Europe

first_imgAfter its first branch at Orlando International Airport, in the southeastern state of Florida, Carwiz has positioned itself in one of the most important U.S. financial centers and the third largest airport in the United States, Miami International Airport. Thus, after a little more than a year, Carwiz is present on as many as four continents and 20 destinations through a franchise form of business. But the story of the expansion has only just begun, the ice has been broken, and now only the sky is the limit. With the newly signed franchise partnership, Carwiz’s franchise business model is available from this year at two new destinations. At eight locations and over 600 vehicles in Romania as well as in Portugal. After breaking through on American market, which in itself is a huge success, Carwiz continues to expand through the franchise model and the U.S. market. With the new franchise partnership, Carwiz International has become richer for two new destinations in Southeast and Western Europe. RELATED NEWS: We are happy to follow the daily expansion of the Croatian tourist export product in 2020. The American market has broken through, daytime expansion is expected CARWIZ PRINTS HISTORY. FIRST RENT CAR BRANCH OPENED ON THE AMERICAN MARKETlast_img read more

Forward-fund agreed

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Experts slam agriculture reform program, warn of shortage amid pandemic

first_imgThe government data presented by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo on April 28 showed that over 20 provinces faced shortages of staple food, such as garlic, sugar, chili and eggs.Read also: Virus, climate change cause food shortages in parts of IndonesiaAgrarian Reform Consortium (KPA) secretary-general Dewi Kartika said the government’s botched agrarian reform program was to blame for the shortages as a vast plots of farmland were constantly being encroached by mining concessions and corporate plantations.“According to the National Land Agency’s data, our farmland shrank by 650,000 hectares in 2018. Many were converted to be used by other business sectors such as palm oil, natural resources extraction and infrastructure,” she said. Agrarian reform is among the National Priority Programs pushed by Jokowi’s first-term administration in an effort to better distribute development and improve the people’s life quality.It includes programs that are expected to alleviate poverty in villages, improve the country’s food security and land production, acknowledge ownership rights over plots of land owned by individuals, the state and the general public, including land utilization for the people’s interest.Dewi also slammed the government’s plan to clear 600,000 ha of peatland in Central Kalimantan to produce buffer stocks amid the shortage, as a similar measure under former president Soeharto on 1 million ha of peatland resulted in crop failure and subsequent starvation.Read also: Rice stock in check despite low production, high demandWe tried that approach during the Soeharto era, which ended with catastrophic failures. In addition, the program also created unprecedented ecological damages,” she said.According to a report released in April by the Global Network Against Food Crises, a humanitarian organization initiated by the World Food Program (WFP), a total of 135 million people lived with acute hunger at the end of 2019. The number was likely to jump to 265 million as countries enforcing quarantines amid the pandemic, the report said.As Indonesia relies on imports, market protectionism, especially during COVID-19 outbreak, could prompt other countries to halt their food exports. Such a policy could cause food shortages in countries that relied on the exports to fulfill their needs, said agriculture expert Sofyan Sjaf.“The [WFP] has warned that millions of people could face food shortages as agriculture production yields drop due to the pandemic,” he said during the same discussion. “We saw Vietnam take a precautionary step to prevent a potential shortage by clamping down on exports.”Read also: Lawmakers, farmers object to provision on food imports in omnibus bill on job creationSofyan also urged the government to curb the COVID-19 outbreak in rural areas to prevent a decrease in food production, as the majority of farmers are vulnerable to the disease.More than 22,000 people have contracted COVID-19, with the death toll reaching at least 1,300 as of Sunday afternoon.“Around 61 percent of our farmers are over 45 years old. We should increase our testing in rural regions and should not relax large-scale social restrictions [PSBB] when the infection rate is still high,” he said.Topics : Agriculture experts have criticized the government’s agrarian reform program a lack of progress that led to low production yield and mounting food imports, pointing to possible food shortages if the COVID-19 pandemic continues.University of Indonesia (UI) senior economist Faisal Basri has voiced his concerns over the increasing number of food imports over the years, saying that the government had been overly reliant on imports to cover the shortcomings of Indonesia’s agriculture industry.“Last year we imported US$830 million worth of meat, $1.5 billion worth of fruits and $770 million worth of vegetables. Most of our imports also came from China, on which we become overly reliant,” he said during a virtual public discussion on Friday.last_img read more

First-home buyers rush to secure their land before grant expires

first_imgSekisui House has launched their new Wisteria display home amid $9 million in sales in just two months.FIRST-home buyers are snapping up land in Ripley with Sekisui House recording $9 million in sales in just two months.Sekisui House’s Ecco Ripley is reporting intensified sales activity this year with 56 per cent of buyers first-home buyers, 37 per cent investors, six per cent second-plus home buyers and three per cent downsizers.Ecco Ripley sales manager Scott Blaney said with the grant due to expire in June they had experienced an enormous increase in sales from first-home buyers due to the $20,000 grant.“The birth of the Ripley Town Centre, the expansion of the western corridor and the affordability of properties at Ecco Ripley has positioned the area as an ideal place to live, work and play,” Mr Blaney said.Overall, the $500 million community has 66 per cent owner occupiers, with 33 per cent from Ipswich, 40 per cent from greater Brisbane, 17 per cent from interstate and three per cent from the Sunshine Coast.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor7 hours agoSekisui House has also just launched their latest display home, the Wisteria. Wisteria design, Sekisui House’s latest display home.Designed in collaboration with Australian and Japanese designers, the Wisteria highlights natural light, open plan living and focuses on the finer elements of from the position of the light switches to passive climate control.Mr Blaney said the four-bedroom, two-bathroom 234sq m home priced from $205,200, had been carefully planned to suit Queensland living.“Thorough attention is given to the position and placement of windows, and how the sun penetrates into the habitable areas within the home, to optimise enjoyment for all family members,” he said.Mr Blaney said the open-plan design fostered family togetherness, which is at the heart of the Sekisui House’s design philosophy. Get the latest real estate news direct to your inbox for free.last_img read more

Siem Aimery Resumes Inter-Array Cable Works at Beatrice

first_imgAfter installing 16 inter-array cables at the Beatrice offshore wind farm in late 2017, the cable laying vessel Siem Aimery continued the works with the second campaign that started on 10 March.Image source: BOWL Notice to MarinersWithin the ongoing campaign, the Siem Aimery is clearing the cable routes of any surface debris by performing a pre-lay grapnel run (PLGR) and will install up to 34 inter array cables.The cables will be laid and buried between the wind turbines and the Offshore Transformer Module (OTM) foundations.Cable burial will be undertaken by a tracked jet trencher launched from the Siem Aimery. Three trenching trial cables will be surface-laid and secured by clump weights. These trial cables will be recovered during the third cable installation campaign scheduled for July/August.The first campaign was supported by the cable support vessel (CSV) Siem Stingray, and now those tasks will be carried out by the CSV Siem Barracuda. The vessel will assist with the inter-array cable installation activities by providing personnel transfer to wind turbine foundations with Ampelmann Gangway, as well as crane operations to transfer equipment to and from the foundations. The CSV will also be in charge of work class ROV activities at the seabed in the vicinity of the foundations, and survey activities along the planned inter-array cable routes linking the foundations.The 588MW Beatrice offshore wind farm comprises 84 Siemens 7MW wind turbines and two Siemens Offshore Transformer Modules which will be inter-connected by 91 x 33kV medium voltage alternating current submarine composite cables, manufactured by JDR.JDR will also provide Siem Offshore with termination and testing services for the wind farm’s inter-array cable system.last_img read more

Modec hires Prosafe unit for work in Brazilian waters

first_imgProsafe, an operator of offshore accommodating units known as flotels, has been awarded a contract by Japan’s Modec for the provision of a semi-submersible accommodation vessel.Safe Concordia; Image: © ProsafeProsafe said on Tuesday that the contract was awarded by Modec’s subsidiary, Modec Serviços de Petróleo do Brasil.The contract is for the provision of the Safe Concordia semi-submersible accommodation vessel to support specific Modec FPSO operations in Brazil.According to the company, the firm duration of the contract begins in September 2018 and will last for 200 days with a 15-day option.Prosafe added that the contract value, although left undisclosed, included mobilization and demobilization.Jesper Kragh Andresen, Prosafe CEO, said: “Prosafe is very pleased with this contract, as it marks the re-entrance of Safe Concordia in Brazilian waters.“We have a good track-record of providing gangway connected accommodation services to both spread and turret moored FPSOs, and we will endeavor to offer the best possible services to Modec, which we consider to be an important customer with significant potential future demand going forward.”It is worth noting that the Safe Concordia was in lay up since the third quarter 2017 following contract completion with Petrobras.The Safe Concordia is a dynamically positioned (DP2) semi-submersible accommodation rig with beds for 461 persons built at the Keppel FELS shipyard in Singapore and delivered in March 2005.last_img read more

BBC Caribbean Service makes final broadcast

first_img Sharing is caring! Share The BBC Caribbean Service is making its final broadcasts, ending seven decades of programming for the region.The service is being shut as part of budget cuts announced by the BBC World Service in January.BBC managers say they have had to make tough choices because of a 16% cut in UK government funding.But one critic called it a short-sighted decision, showing the BBC did not understand the complexities of the region.The Macedonian, Albanian, Serbian and Portuguese for Africa services have also been closed in a bid to to save $75m (£46m) a year.Seven other language services have moved away from radio to focus on online, mobile and television content.These include Spanish for Latin America which last month ended its remaining radio broadcasts, on short-wave and intended mainly for Cuba.This week, members of the Caribbean Service team have each presented a final programme, including material from the BBC archives.Copies of the sound and text content of the service’s radio and online output are being donated to the University of the West Indies, which will have a team working at the BBC’s Bush House base to catalogue the material.Regional voice?E-mails to the Caribbean Service overwhelmingly voiced sadness at its closure.“It filled a great need for the Caribbean audience to have a view of the world not provided by local radio stations,” wrote Jacqueline Sharpe in Trinidad and Tobago.Regional media commentators have said the demise of the BBC Caribbean Service should spur renewed efforts to create a pan-Caribbean news network.“Since the announcement, we have come to truly know the important role we have been playing across the Caribbean. We’re going out on a high – what more can any broadcaster ask for?” said Caribbean Service head Debbie Ransome.The origin of the Caribbean Service was Calling the West Indies, a programme that began in 1939, featuring West Indian troops on active service during World War II reading letters to their families.From 1943 to 1958, it became Caribbean Voices, highlighting West Indian writers, including VS Naipaul, George Lamming, Andrew Salkey and Samuel Selvon.In 1949, We See Britain was introduced as part of the programming for the Caribbean under the management of cricketer-turned-producer Ken Ablack.Over the next three decades, the Caribbean Service nurtured producers and presenters, including Trevor McDonald who became one of the best-known newsreaders on British television.The service closed in the mid-1970s, but in 1988 it reopened as a news and current affairs department.David Jessop, director of the London-based Caribbean Council, has described the closure as another marker of Britain’s “less than joined-up approach to the region”.In an article at the time of the announcement in January, he said: “The sole vehicle offering the region the chance to hear on a daily basis about events from a broader perspective and sometimes hold politicians to account, will be no more and leading figures in public life will find it virtually impossible to present their views to a region-wide radio audience.”Announcing the cuts, BBC Global News director Peter Horrocks said the closures were “not a reflection on the performance of individual services or programmes”.“They are all extremely important to their audiences and to the BBC,” he said.“It is simply that there is a need to make savings due to the scale of the cuts to the BBC World Service’s grant-in-aid funding from the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and we need to focus our efforts in the languages where there is the greatest need and where we have the strongest impact.”BBC World Have Your Say is broadcasting a special programme from the Caribbean on 25 March at 1800 GMT to mark the last day of the BBC Caribbean Service, with reporters in Jamaica, Trinidad and Antigua.“Since the announcement, we have come to truly know the important role we have been playing across the Caribbean. We’re going out on a high – what more can any broadcaster ask for?” said Caribbean Service head Debbie Ransome.The origin of the Caribbean Service was Calling the West Indies, a programme that began in 1939, featuring West Indian troops on active service during World War II reading letters to their families.From 1943 to 1958, it became Caribbean Voices, highlighting West Indian writers, including VS Naipaul, George Lamming, Andrew Salkey and Samuel Selvon.In 1949, We See Britain was introduced as part of the programming for the Caribbean under the management of cricketer-turned-producer Ken Ablack.Over the next three decades, the Caribbean Service nurtured producers and presenters, including Trevor McDonald who became one of the best-known newsreaders on British television.The service closed in the mid-1970s, but in 1988 it reopened as a news and current affairs department.David Jessop, director of the London-based Caribbean Council, has described the closure as another marker of Britain’s “less than joined-up approach to the region”.In an article at the time of the announcement in January, he said: “The sole vehicle offering the region the chance to hear on a daily basis about events from a broader perspective and sometimes hold politicians to account, will be no more and leading figures in public life will find it virtually impossible to present their views to a region-wide radio audience.”Announcing the cuts, BBC Global News director Peter Horrocks said the closures were “not a reflection on the performance of individual services or programmes”.“They are all extremely important to their audiences and to the BBC,” he said.“It is simply that there is a need to make savings due to the scale of the cuts to the BBC World Service’s grant-in-aid funding from the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and we need to focus our efforts in the languages where there is the greatest need and where we have the strongest impact.”BBC World Have Your Say is broadcasting a special programme from the Caribbean on 25 March at 1800 GMT to mark the last day of the BBC Caribbean Service, with reporters in Jamaica, Trinidad and Antigua.Source: BBC News 46 Views   no discussions Tweetcenter_img NewsRegional BBC Caribbean Service makes final broadcast by: – March 25, 2011 Share Sharelast_img read more

Potential for severe storms this afternoon and evening

first_imgSoutheastern, IN—Today is a good day to be weather aware.  The National Weather Service says the potential for severe weather developing in the area today is possible.  Meteorologist Emily Chipman tells us the best threat for severe storms from 2 pm to 5 pm. Hazards include damaging winds, hail, tornadoes, torrential downpours, and cloud to ground lightning.Chipman says that while the main threat is this afternoon between 2-5 pm, the potential for storms moving into evening hours is possible. Make sure you have a way to receive weather alerts such as staying tuned to 103.9 WRBI and plan now on what to do if severe weather approaches your location.last_img

Clarke: Don’t barrack Odemwingie

first_img Press Association Clarke confirmed Odemwingie is part of his plans to face the Black Cats, returning to favour after his Twitter rants against the club and the bitter on-off transfer saga with QPR last month. Head coach Clarke knows some supporters will be in no mood to forgive Odemwingie but he has asked them to put any negativity towards the Nigeria international to one side. Clarke said: “I understand some of the supporters might not want to forgive Peter quickly but, when they go to the stadium, all I ask is they support the team.” Steve Clarke has urged West Brom supporters not to let their feelings towards striker Peter Odemwingie affect their backing for the team in Saturday’s home clash with Sunderland.center_img He added: “If Peter scores a hat-trick and they choose not to celebrate Peter’s goals, they should celebrate the fact that the team have scored. “All we can ask is that the supporters support the team and don’t allow their feelings over one player to over-ride the fact that the support has been great this year, home and away.” Clarke admitted Albion’s shortage of options means Odemwingie will play again this season. He said: “We’ve had a couple of little chats but nothing in-depth and he knows the situation. “He knows he needs to work hard and he has to be ready for his opportunity when it comes and, for sure, it will come, because we only carry a small squad. “Will he be considered for Saturday? Absolutely. I’ve got 20 players available and he’ll be involved with the 20 players.” last_img read more

Vieira: Gunners lack leadership

first_img Vieira was Arsene Wenger’s midfield lynchpin from 1996 to 2005, part of the “Invincibles” who claimed the 2003/04 Premier League title without tasting defeat. Arsenal have failed to win a major trophy since Vieira’s 2005 exit and the former France midfielder said Wenger’s side are still craving more talismanic figures. Press Association The Gunners top the Barclays Premier League by five points but World Cup winner Vieira still believes they would benefit from greater guidance from their senior squad figures. Vieira said: “I think when you look at Arsenal they play fantastic football, but you need to win games playing badly and I don’t think Arsenal are capable of that at the moment. “And maybe as well there is a lack of leadership. “They may not have a Tony Adams, a Sol Campbell, a Martin Keown. These kinds of players who can be a leader on and off the field.” Vieira was speaking for ITV’s documentary Keane and Vieira: The Best of Enemies, to be aired on Tuesday night, chronicling the rivalry between the former Arsenal and Manchester United counterparts. Vieira also revealed he turned his back on a move to Real Madrid at the last minute in 2004, admitting he would have left Arsenal at that stage had he known he would prove surplus to requirements a year later. He said: “I was really close to leaving for Madrid the year before I left. “The deal was done between the two clubs, so when it was time for me to leave I changed my mind because I believed that I wanted to stay at Arsenal, I wanted to finish my career at Arsenal. “I didn’t see any reason to leave, I don’t know if it was lack of courage to go. “If I knew I was leaving the year after, I was going to Madrid.” center_img Arsenal’s “lack of leadership” is damaging their quest for the top trophies, according to former player Patrick Vieira.last_img read more