Claassens commits to Bath

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Click here to follow Butch James on Twitter Head Coach, Steve Meehan, added “We are extremely happy that Michael has decided to extend his contract with the Club for another two years. He is a quality bloke, completely professional, hard working and one of the most honest players you’ll come across. He is a great example to all the players.”center_img Bath Rugby is pleased to announce that scrum-half Michael Claassens has signed a contract extension which will see him stay with us for another two years.Claassens joined Bath Rugby for the start of the 2007/08 season, and quickly established himself as an integral member of the team. A tough and combative scrum-half, he has gained a reputation as being one of the most consistent players in his position in the Premiership. He captained the side last season and also developed a great partnership with fellow South African fly half Butch James, which helped galvanise a dynamic back line.Commenting on the news Claassens said “I am very excited about the future of Bath Rugby, and want to be a part of all the developments going on here. Me and my wife love Bath, both the Club and the city, and are really looking forward to staying.”last_img read more

Consistency is key for referees at the 2015 World Cup

first_imgIRB Match Official Manager Joel Jutge explains how he plans to achieve refereeing consistency at next year’s World Cup in England Video replay: this Owen Farrell try in the Premiership final was later ruled out after a TMO interventionRW: Are you involved in making changes to the TMO’s remit eg, the intervention on the Owen Farrell try in the Premiership final?JJ: Well, IRB Rugby Committee is involved, indirectly. Ultimately, domestic leagues such as Premiership Rugby implement their own TMO protocols but of course it’s within a framework of existing IRB laws and guidelines. Any change in laws or guidelines is made with complete consultation of the Law Review Group and the Rugby Committee.My role is to provide the perspective of the match officials to the debate but Rugby Committee has to consider a number of other perspectives as well before recommending a particular set of TMO protocols. We maintain a good working relationship with our unions and their domestic leagues. For example, Premiership Rugby has been to the fore in trialling TMO protocols and various other initiatives over the years. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS For more from this interview with Jutge, see the September 2014 issue of Rugby World – on sale on Tuesday 5 August.center_img RUGBY WORLD interviewed IRB Match Official Manager Joel Jutge, the former Test referee, about his role and his plans for the 2015 World Cup…RW: What will your role involve as you prepare for RWC 2015?  JJ: Most of what we are doing at the moment is geared towards RWC 2015. We want to ensure that we have the best possible panel of match officials ready for the next World Cup. To achieve this requires a combination of good training, performance review (particularly self-review by referees themselves), consistency in the application of law at international level and, of course, astute selection.My role is to help bring all those things together while working with the elite referees, the various referee managers and the IRB Match Official Selection Committee, which is led by John Jeffrey. It is also important for me to communicate with international team coaches to take their views on board and inform them of any changes in focus.RW: What are your aims for refereeing at RWC 2015?  JJ: Ultimately, we want the match officials to be worthy of the world’s pinnacle rugby tournament through their strong, empathetic and consistent refereeing. Just like all the teams, we know that the hard work being done today will hopefully prepare the referees to arrive at RWC 2015 in a calm, confident and determined state of mind ready to do their best. As always, we want the actions of the players to be the focus. Man in the middle: Craig Joubert blows the final whistle in the RWC 2011 final between NZ and France last_img read more

The All Blacks face fitness concerns of their own

first_imgWith Billy Vunipola ruled out of the tour, the All Blacks fans cannot afford to gloat as they have a number of fitness concerns ahead of the Series Full-back: Ben SmithThe mercurial full-back who resembles Clark Kent off the pitch, but turns into Superman on it (albeit dressed in black) has sat out the last couple of games with an ankle injury, incurred against the Stormers but the smoke signals suggest the injury should be overcome by June 25.Likely to step up if not fit: The pocket-sized excitement machine, Damien McKenzie, has been turning on the style for the Chiefs, but it’s the younger brother of Beauden, the 6ft 5in Jordie Barrett, who has the composure and importantly, the kicking percentages to make a difference. He’s only 19, but don’t be surprised if he’s drafted into the squad.Wing: Israel DaggBetter known as a full-back, who won the 2011 World Cup, the Canterbury Crusader side a passable impression of a very fine wing last years, plundering eight tries in an outstanding season. This year, he’s been laid low with a knee-injury since mid-March, and is due back in early June, not giving him much time to get up to speed by the time the squad is announced on June 8Likely to step up if not fit: Waisake NaholoThe Highlander has had a mixed Super Rugby season, scoring freely but is just back from a red-card and subsequent one-week ban for a late tackle against the Blue Bulls. If Naholo is overlooked, expect his hot-stepping team-mate, Nehe Milner-Skudder, himself recovering from a nightmare near 18-months on the sidelines, is likely to get a callSlow progress: Sonny Bill Williams is feeling his way back to form after a long injuryOutside-centre: Sonny Bill Williams is working his way back after a nine-month injury-enforced break after damaging his ACL in the Rio Olympics and he will be left to sweat over his place. He’ll be pushed hard by youngster Anton Lienert-Brown, who emerged in last year’s Rugby Championship, who can play at 12 and 13 and recently spurned the Crusaders to stay with the Chiefs. The Canes’ Vince Aso is in fine form.Inside-centre: Ryan Crotty is super-dependable for the in-from Crusaders, while Highlander Malakai Fekitoa provides an explosive outlet from the bench. Another player to be considered is Hurricanes centre Ngani ‘Mini Bus’ Laumpape who is being backed for a call-up after 12 tries in Super Rugby so far.Wing: Julian SaveaWith 45 tries in 52 appearances, Savea is the player the Lions fear most and the Hurricane has been in prolific form so far in Super Rugby, crossing the whitewash seven times in 10 appearances. If Savea pulls up lame, expect Blues speedster Reiko Ioane to get some backing. A potential bolter to be a star of the Series.Fly-half: Beauden Barrett/Aaron CrudenBarrett is the most dangerous broken-field runner in the world, but due to his iffy place-kicking – he hadn’t kicked for nearly two months until the weekend – there are calls for Cruden not be given the No 10 shirt and Barrett to slot in at No 15. That’s a long-shot but Cruden has been in exemplary form for the Chiefs this year and is the more dependable goal kicker.Catch me if you can: Beauden Barrett is a scintillating runnerScrum-half Aaron SmithSmith, for a couple of years, the best scrum-half in the world, until off-the-field indiscretions upset his rhythm last year. Pushing him hard is the Hurricanes’ No 9 TJ Perenara, who would walk into any other team on the planet.No 8 Kieran ReadIn the same way as the Lions fans held their head in their hands, when Billy Vunipola was ruled out, New Zealand held their collective breath when they heard Kieran Read was laid up in a Japanese hospital with a broken thumb. The 97-cap All Black captain is expected to be fit for the Series, but may have played no rugby for two months if he lines up in the First Test. Risky.Likely to step up if not fit: With the abrasive Liam Squire in the same boat as Read, after breaking his thumb against the Cheetahs, it may come down to the Blues’ Akira Ioane or Steven Luatua, to offer the power and precision from the base of the scrum. The Crusaders’s Jordan Taufua is a rank outsider.Openside: Sam CaneHe maybe the more dependable, safe option, than Ardie Savea, who sets pulses racing so frequently, but Sam Cane is rock-solid in defence, powerful over the ball and possesses leadership qualities if Read and Kaino fail to make the first Test. Savea Jnr is the next cab off the rank for the All Blacks. Able to play anywhere across the backrow, and probably even wing, he has been topping the stats charts again for his metres run turnovers and tackles. A potential star of the Series, if he gets game-time.Eyes on the ball: Sam Cane is never far from the actionBlindside: Jerome Kaino LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Comeback trail: The All Blacks have concerns over a number of first-choice players Akin to Richard Hill, in going under the radar, when placed alongside long-time team-mates, Richie McCaw and Kieran Read, Kaino, nevertheless is a key component of the All Blacks backrow and his knee-injury, which should bring him back within weeks of the first Test, will be cause for considerable anxiety for Steve Hansen’s coaching team.Likely to step up if not fit: The aforementioned Liam Squire is in a race to be fit, so Elliot Dixon or Steven Luatua, would seem most likely to get the call to slot in at blindside.Lock: Brodie RetallickThe former World Player of the Year is a brilliant athlete, who is as likely to pop deft pass in midfield as he is to pick a ball off the top of the lineout. He has been in imperious form for the Chiefs. If he’s fit, he starts. Favourite to act as his understudy is Beauden’s brother, Scott, who is nursing a few leg injuries, but is expected to be fit for the Series.Lock: Sam WhitelockThere is little doubt Whitelock will partner Retallick in the Test Series. The 84-cap All Black offers the grunt at the front of the lineout and is aggressive in the tight exchanges. His back up is a toss-up between Patrick Tuipulotu and Luke Romano.Nuisance: Sam Whitelock is a hugely experienced lock for the All BlacksTighthead: Owen FranksFranks may hold the record for the most Test appearances without a try (90) but he’s the anchor of the All Blacks scrum and the closest Steve Hansen has to a human immovable object.Hooker: Dane ColesColes is another hooker to wear the ‘best in the world’ tag in his position. Accurate at the set-piece, he’s a brilliant all-court No 2, who is at home in the wide channels and making explosive bursts through opposition defences. The worry for Coles, and the All Blacks is that he hasn’t played for two months due to concussion concerns. Touch and go.Likely to step up if not fit: Codie Taylor will duke it out with Nathan Harris if Coles fails to recover in time but neither player is an improvement on the brilliant Hurricane.Class apart: Dane Coles is widely recognised as the world’s best hookerLoosehead: Joe MoodyAlong with his durable tighthead Owen Franks, Moody was part of a Crusaders scrum that nullified the Hollywood backline of the Hurricanes by starving them of ball and he’ll be a key component of the All Blacks scrum.last_img read more

Wales Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide

first_img Expand Wales Rugby World Cup FixturesMon 23 Sep Wales 43-14 Georgia (Toyota) Match reportSun 29 Sep Australia 25-29 Wales (Tokyo) Match reportWed 9 Oct Wales 29-17 Fiji (Oita) Match ReportSun 13 Oct Wales 35-13 Uruguay (Kumamoto) Match ReportSun 20 Oct QF3 Wales 20-19 France (Oita) Match ReportSun 27 Oct SF2 Wales 16-19 South Africa (Yokohama) Match ReportFri 1 Nov Third-place Play-off New Zealand 40-17 Wales (Tokyo), 9.00am Match Report Japan 2019 was the Lelos’ fifth World Cup Georgia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide In Warren Gatland’s last tournament as Wales coach until Wayne Pivac takes over, they are looking to give one last hurrah against New Zealand. Uruguay Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Georgia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Fiji Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Expand Collapse Uruguay Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Wales Rugby World Cup Kit A sporadic qualifier for the World Cup, Uruguay… Australia always seem to raise their game for… Wales Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, GuideWales are looking to end their 2019 Rugby World Cup with one last win over New Zealand in the third-place playoff.How They QualifiedWales were one of the 12 automatic qualifiers for the 2019 tournament.Key PlayersInjuries to Taulupe Faletau and Gareth Anscombe are a blow but they are laden with stars: Alun Wyn Jones, Jonathan Davies, Dan Biggar, George North, Liam Williams…Pure joy: Alun Wyn Jones celebrates with the trophy after Wales are crowned Six Nations champions (Getty Images)The Coach – Warren GatlandThis will be Warren Gatland’s last hurrah with Wales. He’s given much to the cause and brought Six Nations success. Playing style aside, a nagging negative has been results against southern hemisphere sides – but they laid their Aussie hoodoo to rest last year. What a time to do so…Last hurrah: Gatland is looking to win the Cup as his last act with the Wales team (Getty Images)Major Work-onsAlways competitive, Wales have an incredible defence but they need to expand their attacking game. In the Six Nations, they ranked bottom of the attack stats – lowest metres, fewest clean breaks, least defenders beaten.Wales Rugby World Cup Warm-upsSunday 11 August 2019: England 33-19 WalesSaturday 17 August 2019: Wales 13-6 EnglandSaturday 31 August 2019: Wales 17-22 IrelandSaturday 7 September 2019: Ireland 19-10 WalesRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-upsWales Rugby World Cup GroupWales are in Group D alongside Australia, Georgia, Fiji and UruguayRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup Groups Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Fiji Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Here’s everything you need to know about Fiji… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Flashback: Australia will play Wales again in 2019, as they did in 2015 (Getty Images)Wales Rugby World Cup SquadWales have announced their 31-man squad for the Rugby World Cup which you can see below.Forwards (18):Nicky SmithWyn JonesRhys CarreTomas FrancisDillon LewisKen OwensElliot DeeRyan EliasAlun Wyn JonesAdam BeardJake BallAaron ShinglerJosh Navidi (ruled out of the tournament because of a hamstring injury and replaced by Owen Lane on 23 Oct)Ross MoriartyAaron WainwrightJustin TipuricJames DaviesCory Hill (replaced by Bradley Davies after failing to recover from a stress fracture)Backs (13):Gareth DaviesTomos WilliamsAled DaviesDan BiggarRhys PatchellHadleigh ParkesJonathan DaviesOwen WatkinLiam Williams (ruled out of the tournament with an ankle injury on 24 Oct)Leigh HalfpennyGeorge NorthHallam AmosJosh AdamsRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup FixturesPrevious World Cup Results and RecordWales’ Rugby World Cup Record: P37 W21 D0 L161987 Third1991 Pool stages1995 Pool stages1999 Quarter-finals2003 Quarter-finals2007 Pool stages2011 Fourth2015 Quarter-finalsFollow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Expandlast_img read more

Meeting Jesus on the Emmaus Road and the ocean floor

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Don Minton says: center_img Meeting Jesus on the Emmaus Road and the ocean floor Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (1) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 By Danielle TumminioPosted Apr 23, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group May 5, 2012 at 4:34 pm Hi Rev. Tumminio, and thanks for your kind and informative words regarding your visit to the Temple open house and your visit to the Hill Cumorah Pageant in NY. It is good to see some one open minded enough to say what they think without prejudices or narrow mindedness. I am a convert 33 to the LDS Church/Faith, and I have seen so much criticism and misinformation published by those who do not take time to find out what is true and what are rumors. You are indeed a special person who demonstrates the love of our Savior Jesus Christ in your life. I have always been interested in different religions, and have investigated most of the major Christian religions, and I found wonderful and good people who love their fellows and our Savior. I appreciate and respect other religions and their quest for truth and love and a closer walk with God. I know that some religious leaders are not true to the precepts of Christ’s teachings, these are not among those I appreciate. Thank you again for your blog, I will tune in and read more from now on. Don Minton Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Danielle Tumminio[Episcopal News Service] There’s a lot to worry about as a scuba diver: decompression sickness, burst lungs, limited air supplies, and inhospitable sea creatures. But none of this compares to the question most feared by a scuba diver: “Why did your buddy vanish?”Staying with your buddy is the cardinal rule of diving: The buddy is a lifeline with extra air, an extra pair of eyes to spot danger, an extra body for protection. You place your trust, your safety, even your life, in that person.Which explains why I panicked when—six years ago and 60 feet underwater—my scuba partner disappeared. He was staring at a particularly colorful anemone, but after I turned away for a second to grab for my oxygen gauge, he was gone.I looked up. A school of fish passed, but not my buddy.I looked to the right and saw a boulder.I looked behind me, and there was nothing but dark blue water.I thought he was gone, and I thought, in that moment, that I would never get over the loss.But a few seconds later, just as I was about to return to the surface in hopes that he’d done the same, my buddy swam out from behind the large boulder, signaling that he’d lost his balance in a strong current, and landed on the ocean floor behind it. I couldn’t see him for the enormity of the stone, but he’d been there all along. As he grabbed my hand, my heart rate slowed, and we continued our journey together.Although on a different scale, I imagine the disciples experienced those kinds of roller-coaster emotions around the time of Jesus’ death. They’d spent weeks traveling beside their teacher, their Savior, watching him heal the sick and preach the Gospel. And then in a matter of days, they saw him degraded, tortured, dead.There was also, of course, the strange matter of his body’s disappearance.In their shock and grief, one group of disciples walked along the Emmaus Road, telling this spiritual odyssey to a stranger. Then, in the sharing of a meal, something happened: Their eyes saw this stranger differently and they realized it was Jesus, and he’d been with them all along.Just as fear and sadness blinded me from seeing my buddy, so the disciples were blinded from seeing theirs. (Gives a new meaning to the Buddy Christ, doesn’t it?)But the disciples have one thing on me: they saw the resurrection miracle—they got to witness the real thing.None of us are as lucky as those two disciples, who walked beside Jesus on the Emmaus Road and shared a meal with him. Without concrete evidence, it becomes easy for us to wonder if Jesus’ resurrection was just the elaborate prank of all time.Maybe Peter convinced the other disciples to steal the body….Maybe the women who discovered the empty tomb only said they saw an angel…Maybe Jesus pretended to die on the cross…When questions like these arise, it’s almost as if doubt becomes the huge underwater boulder that keeps us from seeing our buddy, and our faith isn’t strong enough to move it. I think God realized that this might happen, that belief without tangible proof is too much to ask of us, just as God knew the same about the disciples on the Emmaus Road.I think God also knew that we like to eat.Which perhaps is why the disciples’ eyes were only opened to Jesus’ true identity in the bread and wine. And that, I think, is where their story overlaps with ours. You see, biblical scholars believe that the disciples on the Emmaus Road weren’t the ones at the Last Supper. They hadn’t seen Jesus break bread before. Which means that these disciples weren’t remembering something they’d already seen; they were experiencing a new thing. Jesus gives us that same opportunity: In sharing that Holy Communion together, we meet the risen Christ. We are given evidence.But we are also asked to believe that Christ will always be beside us, even when communion is complete, when only crumbs remain on the table and the wine goblet is empty. Having experienced communion, our faith becomes a little stronger. Knowing we can come back, reach out our hands and taste the bread and wine again, faith becomes stronger still, making it easier to believe that God is always there, even when evidence is not.As we walk down the long Emmaus Road of our lives, Christ travels beside us on the straight-ways and on the windy switchbacks, on land and in the ocean depths. For that, I rejoice, because it means that even as we descend to the ocean’s depths and rise to its surface, we will always have a companion beside us.– The Rev. Danielle Tumminio lectures at Yale University and is the author of God and Harry Potter at Yale. She currently serves as an interim associate at St. Anne in-the-Fields Episcopal Church in Lincoln, Massachusetts.Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church.last_img read more

Requiem set for retired North Carolina Bishop Robert C. Johnson

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 By ENS staffPosted Jan 3, 2014 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] A requiem Eucharist will be celebrated Jan. 11 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Durham, North Carolina, for retired North Carolina Bishop Robert C. Johnson.Johnson, 75, who was the 10th bishop of the diocese died early on Jan. 3.He served the diocese as bishop from 1994 to 2000. He came to the episcopate having served in the diocese for 30 years as a deacon and a priest, including 19 years as the rector of St. Luke’s, Durham, where he developed a reputation as a preacher and a pastor, according to a biography on the diocesan website.Born on July 18, 1938 in Georgia, he was raised a Southern Baptist and ordained at an early age.While at Yale Divinity School in the early 1960s, he came to seek Holy Orders in the Episcopal Church and was ordained by then-North Carolina Bishop Thomas Augustus Fraser in 1965.“As Bishop, Johnson encouraged the Diocese to engage in healthy and hospitable practices and to honor the ministries of all the baptized, including gay and lesbian members,” his diocesan biography says. “He spoke out strongly against capital punishment and racist behavior and on behalf of weak and marginalized members of society.”In response to growing controversies in the Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion, the diocese said, Johnson appealed to the unity of the church and mutual forbearance.Johns held what his biography calls “the solemn but painful duty” of serving on the House of Bishops’ Ecclesiastical Court which heard, and then dismissed, charges against a fellow bishop, Walter Righter. (Episcopal News Service coverage of that decision is here.Pained by what he saw as signs of a lack of charity at the 1998 Lambeth Conference, the biography says, he subsequently announced his retirement and called for the election of his successor in 2000. The Rev. Canon E. T. Malone, Jr. says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Phyllis Gordon says: January 10, 2014 at 10:31 am His quiet demeanor and wry sense of humor always buoyed me whether sitting with him in council or in prayer. I will miss him and the spirit of conciliation with which he moved among members of the clergy, and when working with the Trustees or Standing Committee. May the Church Triumphant receive him in glory. Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET January 3, 2014 at 9:53 pm Bp. Johnson was my ordaining bishop in 1999 and my friend. He had a gantle soul. I will miss him. Chuck Harner says: Rector Bath, NC Robert Alves says: January 10, 2014 at 8:42 pm There’s an old expression that “he’s a good man”. Bob Johnson epitomized the literal meaning of the phrase – he was, in every sense, a “GOOD” man. He was the most decent, caring human being I ever meant or will be privileged to meet, and he was also the best week-to-week consistently excellent preacher I ever hope to know. God rest his soul. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Debbie Walker says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL January 4, 2014 at 10:23 am May his soul rest in peace Amen Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 January 4, 2014 at 11:00 pm Bob Johnson was our parish priest at St. Luke’s for our first four years in Durham, and was the kindest, most wonderful man! The church could use more like him! Talmage G Bandy says: Audrey Nickel says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Obituary, Paul Harner says: Teresa says: House of Bishops, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (13) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC January 4, 2014 at 9:22 am Bob Johnson was a great man – a great preacher, pastor, mentor, friend. When we moved to North Carolina in 1985, we knew we’d be shopping for an Episcopal church home. That first Sunday, we attended St. Luke’s, and we never went anywhere else. The intern at St. Luke’s at the time was Anne Hodges-Copple, now Bishop Suffragan after having served as Rector of St. Luke’s, and the Transitional Deacon was the remarkable Brooks Graebner, now Rector of St. Matthews in Hillsborough. Bob certainly provided a nurturing environment for all. We were honored to be invited to attend his consecration as Bishop. I love him and Connie, and I will miss him so. January 7, 2014 at 10:40 pm Phyllis, we’ve been so out of touch for so many years. How to reach you and Steve? Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS January 3, 2014 at 6:03 pm I am proud to say that I knew Bp. Johnson as our Bishop while I served as a Diocesan Delegate to our Conventions during his tenure. He was a wonderful leader and a kind, compassionate human being. He will be sorely missed by everyone in our Diocese. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Requiem set for retired North Carolina Bishop Robert C. Johnson Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK People Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events January 4, 2014 at 9:03 am Bishop Johnson was one of the most decent, honest, and honorable men I have ever known. It was a privilege to serve on diocesan staff during his tenure. He demanded good work but respected the professionalism of those around him, tolerating differences of opinion and spending more time listening than pontificating. He was concerned about growing “congregationalism” and emphasized that the diocese is the basic unit of the church. He worked quietly to enhance the role of women and minorities. I attended the 1994 and 1997 General Conventions and the 1998 Lambeth Conference with him, observing his grief at the conflicts in the church over human sexuality. A man of great compassion and genuine humility, he spent much time responding personally to calls and letters from individuals, refusing to delegate to staff what he felt was the responsibility of the Bishop as shepherd of his flock. I do not know of anyone who was not saddened when he decided to retire after only six years as bishop, and we urged him to stay, but he seemed to feel that he was inadequate for the job. To the contrary, I shall always remember Bob Johnson, a truly Lincoln-like figure, and at times a “man of sorrows,” as the epitome of a true leader of his people. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA January 7, 2014 at 10:32 pm Bishop Johnson — just “Bob” to all of us, since he despised titles — was a pastor and priest in the best sense of both words. He and Connie could not have led all of us in any better way than just to be themselves. Many of us remember him for his gifts from the pulpit, but he should be remembered most for his gifts as a friend and mentor to all. Gifts that should not be forgotten. Rest well, Bob. Press Release Service Dotun Olagoke says: Paul Harner says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem January 7, 2014 at 10:28 pm Bob was the first priest to welcome me to the diocese at my first clergy conference in 1993. I will always remember his personal warmth and gentle spirit. It was a joy to serve under his leadership as bishop and a pleasure to spend a few spring days together catching rock fish on the Roanoke River. Connie, you will be in my thoughts and prayers this Saturday. January 5, 2014 at 5:27 pm I also am proud to say that I knew him and his wife as well. He was a wonderful leader, and a very caring man for all peoples. He will be missed. But God has called him home, he has run his race and he ran it well. Submit an Event Listing January 3, 2014 at 5:35 pm +Bob,Was my Bishop for 6 years. He ordained me and was a pastor to me. He was a very kind and dedicated man, tirelessly working for reconciliation and unification. He was also an all around great man. Though I have been away from the Diocese of North Carolina for many years I still mourn his death and will miss him.Greg ProctorChapel of the CrossRolling Fork, Mississippi Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Timothy Kimbrough says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Greg Proctor says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Texas: Houston church uses pottery to engage spirituality

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Texas: Houston church uses pottery to engage spirituality Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Texas] At a Lenten Pottery and Spirituality Workshop, the Rev. Eric Hungerford encouraged participants to be “co-creators with God.” The event at St. Mark’s Between the Bayous, Houston, on March 29 was an opportunity for community members to learn pottery and engage on a deeper level of understanding of the creative process.“God is the great creator, and we are also made to be creators.” Hungerford told participants before reading a prayer for artists. “There is the great image from Isaiah that God is the potter, and we are the clay. Over time, we are made into the masterpiece that God wants us to be. I think that this is a really cool way for us to get creative and explore our inner selves.”More images are available here.Community member and potter, Sally Kirk, led the workshop. Kirk, a middle school orchestra teacher, has been working with pottery and sculpture for about three years. Her pottery studio is located across the street from the middle school, and often times she will leave work and immediately begin work on her pottery. She says that working with the potter’s wheel is an especially spiritual process.“I think there is something about the wheel spinning that is really hypnotic, and it just takes me away from reality,” she said. “It is like meditation; I just go away.”During the workshop, participants were encouraged to strike the “gong,” a Tibetan singing bowl, for a moment of silence. Then, they could read a one of several prayers about art or creation that were provided on slips of paper.Kirk believes that the act of working with clay parallels the human experience. “Clay is a model of us being molded,” she explained. Much like clay and pottery, “we have bumps and bruises and none of us are perfect. When something doesn’t work out, you can just smash it up and start over again with the same clay. It’s limitless.”Sitting around the potter’s wheel or slowly working on a sculpture gives us a glimpse into God, said Kirk. “I get the snapshot of God working on our hearts and continually growing us and shaping us. We get to take part in that in some earthly way: growing something from a piece of mud. It is a really holy experience.”Kirk joined St. Mark’s Between the Bayous community less than a year ago, but has already taken an active role. As a satellite campus of St. Mark’s in Bellaire, the church describes itself as a “sustainable, organic, and local Episcopal community” located just outside of downtown Houston between White Oak Bayou and Buffalo Bayou. Services are offered on Sunday and Tuesday nights. Sometimes the group meets in their church building, which doubles as a comedy club (Station Theater), and other times they meet at a local bar.At the center of the church’s mission is the idea that everyone is welcome and all perspectives respected. Art, music, and open discussion play particularly important roles in the community.Kirk’s husband, John, is an organist currently working for Holy Trinity, Dickinson, but before their marriage she had little experience with the Episcopal Church. As a native Houstonian of Egyptian heritage, Kirk spent much of her formative years in the youth group of the Arabic Church of Houston, a non-denominational Christian church serving a variety of immigrants from Middle Eastern countries and beyond. Kirk said she loved the emotional and artistic aspects of that church, but was drawn to the liturgical worship of the Episcopal Church. Still, she had trouble finding an Episcopal Church that met all of her needs.When she heard about Between the Bayous, she sought out Hungerford to find out more. “It was a hard balance to find this place that had it all, but it was all here,” she said. “The first time I came, I was very impressed that Eric would do a sermon and then open it up for discussion. It is a very welcoming community. Afterwards, we will have a beer and talk, and it’s just like hanging out with your best buds.”About 15 people attended the pottery workshop, but the demographic representation could not have been more diverse. Many of Kirk’s friends from the Arabic Church participated in addition to regular members of Between the Bayous. English, French, Spanish, and at least two different Arabic dialects were heard at some point during the event.The novice artists created a variety of pieces including several cups and bowls in addition to more inventive items like sculptured pizza slices and a plate in the shape of a leaf. As part of a larger project, everyone was invited to help build a sculpture of St. Francis that would be placed in the church’s garden. In the true independent spirit of the community, St. Francis was given a thick Mohawk.As the artists debated whether to risk placing the sculpture in a kiln, where the piece may have cracked or even exploded, one participant suggested letting St. Francis dry naturally. They could place the sculpture in the garden, where it would slowly fade with the rain. “Ashes to ashes,” he said. “We can create a new one next year.”Learn more about Between the Bayous here.center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 6, 2014 at 10:04 am What a remarkable article, both in content and meaning !!I would like very much to pass on the information to the powersthat be here in Boise because I can see so many benefits in so manyways. Any information that you could pass on to me, about establishingsomething similar here in Boise ?Have a Blessed Easter,Mel Clark, Oblate OSBSt. Michael’s Cathedral (Episcopal)Boise, Idaho Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN MEL CLARK says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (1) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC By Luke BlountPosted Apr 3, 2014 Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Christmas celebrations canceled in Peshawar after school attack

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA [Anglican Communion News Service] The bishop of Peshawar has said that, following what he called “another unimaginable horror,” the Church of Pakistan has decided to cancel its Christmas celebrations.Peshawar Bishop Humphrey Peters spoke solemnly about the aftermath of the recent attack by the Taliban on a school that left 132 children and nine adults dead.“It is another unimaginable horror that has been unleashed upon this beautiful city,” he said. “The church has already taken the decision to cancel Christmas as a celebration. Instead we will be using the time to come alongside those in the wider community who are grieving and injured.“How can we celebrate and host parties when our city has been so devastated? We will still gather to worship but in a simple, stripped back and prayerful way.”The attack on the Army School in Peshawar, just a few blocks from St. John’s Anglican Cathedral, came just 15 months after twin suicide bombers from a group affiliated to the Taliban murdered more than 100 worshipers of All Saints Church in Peshawar.The bishop said that the church is looking to support communities in practical ways – visiting the injured in hospital, being with their families and supporting the bereaved – whichever faith group they belong to.He stressed that the church would continue to minister to those affected long after the world’s focus has moved elsewhere.“Many of those injured [in 2013] are still receiving treatment,” said Peters. “We need to insure that we stay with families for the long term.” He went on to emphasize that, while there was much anger and despair within the population of Peshawar, the church should remain true to its calling. “We must go on striving to be a source of comfort, of hope and reconciliation – that is the role of church – in good times and bad.”Insar Gohar, the Diocese of Peshawar’s youth coordinator who lost his mother and children in the 2013 bomb blast, said parents of those killed and injured in the recent attack are experiencing “terror and deep grief.”“This [event] reminds the Christians of Peshawar of the attack on All Saints’ Church,” he said. “They are crying with the parents of the children killed today.“Please pray for this situation, for the protection of our city and for peace in our region.”Peters concluded, “We know the pain the wider community is feeling, we share in their devastation and we will walk with them in their anguish.” Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Andy Bowerman, Anglican Alliance with additional reporting by ACNS staffPosted Dec 18, 2014 Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Asia Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Christmas celebrations canceled in Peshawar after school attack Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

El Consejo Ejecutivo recapitula la labor del trienio 2013-2015

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Executive Council March 2015 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 24, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ El Consejo dijo que la reducción no perfeccionaría su eficacia. “Si bien entendemos la preocupación respecto a reducir los costos de gobierno, también nos preocupa que falsas economías pudieran afectar a la Iglesia a largo plazo”, decía la declaración.El Consejo se divide en cinco comités permanentes, además de algunos subcomités ocasionales, y la declaración decía que gran parte de la labor del Consejo tiene lugar en esos pequeños grupos, “lo cual le permite al Consejo participar en un profundo debate sustantivo sobre importantes intereses fiduciarios y misionales en un grupo de tamaño manejable”.Reducir el tamaño del Consejo “significa inevitablemente disminuir la representación y perspectivas de la Iglesia a escala denominacional”, dijo el Consejo, añadiendo que un Consejo más pequeño también significaría “disminuir su capacidad para la supervisión fiduciaria”.La última reunión de la Convención también expresó, mediante la Resolución D016, que “es la voluntad de esta Convención mudar las oficinas centrales del centro denominacional” del edificio que la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera posee en el No. 815 de la Segunda Avenida en Nueva York(La DFMS [Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society] es el nombre legal y canónico con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión).El texto final de la resolución fue notablemente enmendado durante el debate en la Convención para eliminar las instrucciones que le habrían exigido al Consejo vender o alquilar toda la propiedad y reubicar el centro denominacional “tan pronto como fuera económicamente factible”.El Consejo ha dedicado el trienio a estudiar las implicaciones de la D016, y el 21 de marzo convino en conservar y proseguir la labor del subcomité sobre la reubicación del centro denominacional mediante la creación de un comité ad hoc del Consejo Ejecutivo para el próximo trienio.El comité estará encargado de examinar los aspectos misionales, estratégicos y económicos de la ubicación del centro denominacional y ofrecer una recomendación final al Consejo Ejecutivo. La tarea es semejante a la del subcomité cuya labor está por terminar.Bryan Krislock, miembro del Consejo, que copresidía el subcomité con Fredrica Harris Thompsett, dijo que el extenso “proceso de escuchar” del grupo (incluida una encuesta a escala denominacional y entrevistas individuales con “miembros clave”) mostraban que “para decirlo sin tapujos, no había consenso”. El [proceso de] escuchar “revelaba una profunda división entre los miembros de la Iglesia, no sólo específica de los miembros del Consejo sino de los miembros de la Iglesia desde el punto de vista de lo que es la mejor estrategia misional para el centro denominacional”, explicó él.Algunos creen que no es necesario [tener] un edificio, otros dijeron que debía de haber múltiples ubicaciones, otros dijeron que debía de haber una presencia en la zona de Nueva York, pero no en la dirección actual, mientras otros pidieron una localidad más geográficamente central en Estados Unidos. Las “facciones significativas” de opinión provienen de todas partes del país, y en todos los órdenes de ministerio y tienen toda clase de relaciones con la DFMS, dijo Krislock.El subcomité trabajó con profesionales para analizar posibles sitios alternativos y el costo que conllevaban tales mudanzas. “Tenemos una excelente información económica”, le dijo a sus colegas Harris Thompsett. “Disponemos de alguna información estratégica, pero no contamos aún con una clara orientación respecto a un centro o centros de la denominación”.Krislock dijo que el subcomité “sigue forcejeando con las más amplias interrogantes estratégicas acerca de dónde el centro denominacional o el personal de la Iglesia debe ubicarse, como esos [sitios] interactúan con los costos y la mejor manera de evaluar la información económica que hemos recibido y analizarla de una manera significativa para preparar una última recomendación”.Al subcomité le preocupaba que su labor hasta la fecha se perdiera en la transición entre trienios, dijo él. El grupo cree que la labor debe continuar “y no dejar la impresión de que en esencia la hemos abandonado”.Harris Thompsett estuvo de acuerdo, añadiendo “hemos ido tan lejos como pudimos con inteligencia e integridad”.Al preguntarle por qué el nuevo comité presentaría sus recomendaciones finales al Consejo y no a la Convención General, Krislock hizo notar que la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera que es dueña de la propiedad del centro denominacional en Nueva York, y el Consejo, como su junta directiva, es la única entidad que puede tomar la decisión de venderla.El subcomité no tardará en presentar un informe que se propone ser un apéndice al informe del Consejo en el Libro Azul. Ese informe no contendrá especificidades acerca de “impresiones geográficas” o información económica debido al estado incompleto de la labor del subcomité, dijo Harris Thompsett.En otras decisiones, el Consejo:Ratificó la resolución de la Cámara de Obispos del 17 de marzo por la cual pide que una comisión independiente explore las dimensiones canónicas, ambientales, de conducta y de procedimientos de asuntos que conlleven serias deficiencias de individuos que sirven como líderes en la Iglesia. La comisión, que debe ser nombrada por Jefferts Schori en consulta con Jennings, se supone que le preste especial atención a problemas de adicción y de consumo de substancias estupefacientes. El Consejo revisó el presupuesto de 2015 para incluir $150.000 para financiar la labor de la comisión.Aprobó resoluciones por su Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Promoción [o Defensa] Social e Interconexiones tocante a instar a los episcopales, así como a organizaciones gubernamentales y no gubernamentales a combatir la trata de personas, la persecución religiosa y el cambio climático.Convino en exigir que todos los niños y el personal que participe en el Programa Infantil de la Convención General sea vacunado. Un niño puede ser exceptuado de la vacunación si presenta un certificado médico que dé fe que el estado físico de la persona excluye una o más inmunizaciones.La reunión del 19 al 21 de marzo tuvo lugar en el hotel Radisson Salt Lake City Downtown.Resúmenes de las resoluciones aprobadas por el Consejo en esta reunión pueden verse aquí.Algunos miembros del Consejo enviaron mensajes por Twitter usando el código #ExCoun.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC El consejo Ejecutivo se reúne el 21 de marzo en su última sesión plenaria del trienio 2013-2015. La reunión del 19 al 21 de marzo tuvo lugar en el centro de Salt Lake City, cerca del Centro de Convenciones Salt Palace, el lugar donde sesionará la Convención General del 23 de junio al 3 de julio. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City, Utah] El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal durante su reunión del 19 al 21 de marzo en esta ciudad, celebró la labor realizada y se proyectó hacia el porvenir.“Una buena cantidad de energía durante la reunión se dedicó a los problemas de la transición”, dijo la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts durante una conferencia de prensa. “El Consejo Ejecutivo revisó su labor del último trienio e hizo recomendaciones que serán aprobadas en la próxima iteración del Consejo Ejecutivo”.“La labor del Consejo Ejecutivo ha sido intensa este trienio y creo que tienen [sus miembros] buenas razones para sentirse orgullosos de lo que han realizado”, añadió.La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, dijo durante la conferencia de prensa que “una cosa que distingue a este Consejo es que a través del trienio” [sus miembros] han prestado una mirada crítica en lo que respecta a las funciones del Consejo y a la manera en que el Consejo puede tener un funcionamiento aun más efectivo”.Cada uno de los cinco comités permanentes del Consejo escribió un memo a su sucesor, en el que bosquejaba el trabajo realizado, así como la labor parcialmente concluida que recomendaban continuar, y la clase saliente ha escrito un memorando semejante sobre el funcionamiento general del Consejo. La mitad de los 38 miembros termina su período este verano después de la 78ª. reunión de la Convención General.Cuando esa reunión sesione aquí en Salt Lake City, del 23 de junio al 3 de julio, los debates sobre las estructuras de gobierno de la Iglesia Episcopal, incluido el Consejo, se destacarán de manera prominente. En una de sus últimas decisiones del trienio, el Consejo convino en publicar una respuesta a algunas de las recomendaciones del Equipo de Trabajo para Reinventar la Iglesia Episcopal( o TREC, por su sigla en inglés). El TREC surgió de Resolución C095 de la Convención General, la cual solicitaba la creación de un comité que presentara un plan para “reformar las estructuras de gobierno y administración de la Iglesia”.“Había pensado que podría haber un modo de encontrar consenso en torno al informe del TREC, [pero] no creo que haya mucho consenso acerca de ese informe”, dijo al Consejo John Johnson, que presidió un pequeño grupo de miembros del Consejo que redactó la respuesta, al tiempo de someter su informe a la aprobación del pleno.Debido a esa falta de consenso, el comité hizo algunos comentarios generales acerca del informe antes de responder específicamente a lo que el TREC dijo acerca del Consejo Ejecutivo.La declaración, cuyo texto final estará disponible en breve, decía que las resoluciones estructurales del TREC, “si bien audaces para algunos, seguían una senda con frecuencia concentrada en ahorrar dinero, pero sin una clara visión de cuál sería la misión que le permitiría llevar a cabo a la Iglesia una nueva estructura”.La declaración decía que el Consejo está “comprometido con un cambio razonado y audaz en la estructura y el gobierno de la Iglesia Episcopal” y añadía que “el alcance de la labor del TREC puede no haber sido presentar una nueva misión audaz para la Iglesia Episcopal a escala denominacional, sino indagar con la Iglesia qué aspecto podría tener esa renovación”.Deborah Stokes, miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo, dirige la Oración de los Fieles durante la eucaristía del 21 de marzo. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.“¿Es la misión de la Iglesia Episcopal llevar el mundo a la Iglesia o llevar la Iglesia Episcopal al mundo y qué aspecto eso tiene en el siglo XXI?” preguntó el Consejo.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, conforme al Canon I.4 (1)(a). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio]. El TREC ha pedido reducir el número de miembros a 21 “para perfeccionar su eficacia como junta”. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL El Consejo Ejecutivo recapitula la labor del trienio 2013-2015 Temas de gobierno y justicia social acaparan la última reunión Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Executive Council, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Tags Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

Presiding Bishop and Primate speaks on actions at Primates Meeting

first_img Submit an Event Listing January 15, 2016 at 6:01 pm Praise God for Our Primate, Bishop Michael. Let us follow the leader! Rector Shreveport, LA Errol Narain says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN January 28, 2016 at 7:32 pm The Anglican Communion is right on their understanding of Jesus but wrong in their punitive sanctions. Why didn’t they come forward and rescue marriage in the court of the USA even to the Supreme Court? Why did they not come forward and rescue the many church buildings and landsd lost in litigation with the National church? Why did they not come forward rescueing the church itself to proscribe gay and lesbian clergy? No they waited until the clergy in USA decided to change the words of the prayer book denoting genders. truly your calumny toward the episcopal church is wrong. But to say we cannot judge eachother because Jesus does not judge is not understanding the Gospel. Love is not simply embracing eachother it is seeking to be embraced by God. And when you sin no more. this is what Mary Magdalene heard from Him.I pray that you stop being attracted to your human reflections and achieve the enlightenment to be of our Lord seeking to meet Him. I hope this rescues all. January 15, 2016 at 6:10 pm God bless us EVERYONE – EVERY ONE. Thank you, Bishop, for your patient and calm presence.We will see this through together. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Lloyd S. Casson says: January 18, 2016 at 7:55 pm As I know too well (having been part of the debate at Diocesan level) the Church of England has – unilaterally – condoned and allowed remarriage after divorce in church, even if there is an ex-spouse still living. Was the rest of the Anglican Communion “consulted” on this quite radical change before implementation? I think not. Many would condemn it as unbiblical; as certainly Jesus as quoted in the Gospels had far more to say about divorce and remarriage, and nothing at all about any firm definition of marriage as being between ONE woman and ONE man, for life. This comes from the Book of Common Prayer and is Cranmer. Cranmer is not Scripture. The Gospel writers are merely using Genesis in an incorrect manner, where a literal reading of the verse about “therefore a man leaves his father and mother” etc could be taken as a command for all men being required to enter into a heterosexual relationship …including Jesus and the Pope. The Primates’ Meeting statement sanctioning TEC was a mealy mouthed hypocritical pronouncement kowtowing to “the majority”, some of whom probably have polygamous “marriages” in their own Provinces; and disenfranchising all people who are created to love someone of their own sex. People who wish to publicly demonstrate that love in a sacramentally celebrated, faithful relationship. Good on Presiding Bishop Curry. Would that the Anglican Communion had more of his courage and integrity. Many on this side of the pond are with you, TEC, both heterosexual and homosexual. Paul Vandevert says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Howard E. Blunt, Jr. + says: Douglas Hutto says: Comments (21) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME January 16, 2016 at 12:38 am No one can presume to know the mind of God. We will be very surprised when we get to heaven and find those whom you pointed fingers at are there seated wih God. At that point He might just say “Go away. I never knew you.” Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Greg Ladewski says: January 19, 2016 at 1:13 pm Margo, peace to you. I comment only to say that you seem to know such a small minded God, a small God. God is love. Jesus gave us only 2 commandments: love God and love your neighbor as you love yourself. God is love. There will be few, if any, that God pushes away. God’s love is so immense; please don’t diminish God. God loves you and all of us. God is love. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel margo lomax says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Presiding Bishop and Primate speaks on actions at Primates Meeting april mullins says: Angus Ian says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York January 16, 2016 at 10:30 pm The sad reality is that The Episcopal Church cannot go backward, and, for the time being, too much of the Anglican Communion cannot move forward. If this means schism, so be it. We hope for unity, but “Here we stand.” The Episcopal Church is not, and will not be silent on issues of equality, nor will we be cowed by unjust sanctions. The future lies with equality, not bigotry. I do not expect that the Lord will cast anyone out for holding antiquated and bigoted beliefs — these are rooted in a tradition of blindness. Some day we will all stand before the Throne, all sinners, all sincere, and all together. January 16, 2016 at 4:11 am How lucky is the Episcopal Church to be led by a man of faith and integrity who can speak so clearly of the things that make communion a reality between Episcopalians world-wide. How sad for the Church of England that it has failed to live up to genuine Christian integrity and is led at this time by a Chief Executive Officer concerned more with political expediency than true spiritual honesty. For those of us who know, love and have worked for the churches in Africa and who also know and admire TEC, its faithfulness to the opus dei, the outcome of the Primates’ meeting reflects a subtle but dangerous move away from mutual understanding to a polarisation forced by extremists In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group January 20, 2016 at 8:30 pm thank you Bishop Curry…in our perseverance we shall indeed overcome in peace and through the love of our LORD Jesus CHRIST…thank you for you wisdom and diligence. My journey has been one of ups and downs, Bishop Curry. We know each other from the diocese of North Carolina and attended many of the conventions together…your guidance to go back to Galilee is poignant now in light of this recent decision. We are still here and will continue the Jesus movement..many a time in my own journey I pondered the my role and how I could be useful. As a gay man, living out my faith, having sought the diaconate and priesthood and was discouraged, having now being married to my partner of 35 years, both of us serving in our capacities at St Peters, sharing our love of the CHRIST in our lives and others, I am serving now as verger/minister of ceremony in our parish. I spoke earlier in my journey about the priesthood but another bishop was installed during that time and it was just not for a gay man to become a priest. Then I thought I would be a deacon. I did not further that role. All I ever wanted was to serve our LORD in some capacity. My love of liturgy and worship has always been inspiration for me and now with Ft Ollie and Mt Joslyn I have been able to participate in the worship, using the gifts that have been given me…all this is to say that what the primates have deemed unseemly by the Episcopal church in the USA will not discourage me..thank you for your guidance and wisdom. It was always a pleasure to serve you at St Peters in the earlier years as your chaplain..thank you…Doug Hutto January 15, 2016 at 8:34 pm Bishop Curry reminds us that we are centered on Jesus’ message to us that God calls us all to be God’s children, and as such, we are called to minister to each other, to call out the best in each other, to celebrate God’s presence in each of us. Christianity is NOT an exclusive club for those with whom we agree or whom we consider to be “right” or “beautiful.” Christianity is an opportunity to learn about and appreciate and love those different from us while we acknowledge God’s omnipotence and omnipresence. God is bigger than we are! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL January 20, 2016 at 7:28 pm thank you, Jane. Thank you thank you thank you. January 17, 2016 at 4:50 pm A comment of support from an Angkican Priest in Lincoln, England. I and many here are sad at the sanctions put upon the Episcopalian Churc. Am proud to see your response and your desire for the unity of our precious Anglican Communion. It is hoped that the Afrucan Anglicans will also reflect on their own human rights, and heterosexual relations, as there is muc for them to ponder upon. It us so difficult to hold all the diverse cultures in unity in our wonderful Communion. We are a loving, caring and thinking communion. Thank you Bushop Curry for showing this in your humble response.God bless. Bev Bammel says: January 19, 2016 at 9:02 pm Bishop Curry, Thank you so much for your remarkable response to the recent decision in England. I am a long time priest of this church Diocese of Long Island. I am now retired but enjoythe privilege from the Bishop here to continue serving. What is more I am Black and Gay. So I have known full well what it is to be marked by prejudice and hurtful agenda. But I have tried for close to 50 years to serve God’ s people and to preach salvation in the Lord Christ. You have justmarked a map for all here in the USA. And I hope, pray and believe that such grace and that you espouse will give us all much substance wisdom and love whatever and where ever our needs are worldwide. I look forward to some opportunity to meet you personally with a face to face gratitude for who you are and what you are given to do. Howard Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska stewart david wigdor says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem January 15, 2016 at 10:47 pm huh? what is your point? Michael Denny says: dolly patterson says: Submit a Job Listing January 16, 2016 at 5:06 pm We in Canada not only support you, but were there first in our ‘catholic’ (as in inclusive) outlook to firstwomen as complete equals then gay marriage.I expect our African and Asian sisters and brothers will come around in time. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Primates Meeting, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Owen Prince says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued a video statement concerning the actions of the Anglican primates at their meeting in Canterbury, England.The following is the text of the presiding bishop’s statement:Before I say a word about our gathering here at the Primates Meeting, I just want to say a word of thank you to you for all of your prayers: your prayers for this meeting, your prayers for me personally, both here and in my earlier sickness. We are well, and God is God, and I thank you.Let me say a word about the meeting.This is not the outcome we expected, and while we are disappointed, it’s important to remember that the Anglican Communion is really not a matter of structure and organization. The Anglican Communion is a network of relationships that have been built on mission partnerships; relationships that are grounded in a common faith; relationships in companion diocese relationships; relationships with parish to parish across the world; relationships that are profoundly committed to serving and following the way of Jesus of Nazareth by helping the poorest of the poor, and helping this world to be a place where no child goes to bed hungry ever. That’s what the Anglican Communion is, and that Communion continues and moves forward.This has been a disappointing time for many, and there will be heartache and pain for many, but it’s important to remember that we are still part of the Anglican Communion. We are the Episcopal Church, and we are part of the Jesus Movement, and that Movement goes on, and our work goes on. And the truth is, it may be part of our vocation to help the Communion and to help many others to grow in a direction where we can realize and live the love that God has for all of us, and we can one day be a Church and a Communion where all of God’s children are fully welcomed, where this is truly a house of prayer for all people. And maybe it’s a part of our vocation to help that to happen. And so we must claim that high calling; claim the high calling of love and faith; love even for those with whom we disagree, and then continue, and that we will do, and we will do it together.We are part of the Jesus Movement, and the cause of God’s love in this world can never stop and will never be defeated.God love you. God bless you. And you keep the faith. And we move forward.The Most Rev. Michael CurryPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal Church Tags January 15, 2016 at 1:21 pm “You, sinful and godless you !” … yelled the African bishop from the pulpit…while his three wives listened attentively from the pews Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Paul Paynton says: Bernard DeKoninck says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Posted Jan 15, 2016 January 15, 2016 at 8:17 pm Please explain where in the Bible sin is condoned. God is love but He is also a righteous God. From Genesis to Revelation sin is called sin and never accepted. Rector Tampa, FL Video Rector Smithfield, NC Kevin Miller says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA January 21, 2016 at 5:35 pm We cannot change the progress that we have made! Let us continue to show that Jesus loves and welcomes all! Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, January 16, 2016 at 3:36 am Adultery is permitted in African Anglican churches? I thought polygamy was not a Christianpractice! If it is, can women have more than one husband? Seems two single gay people in a marriage is rather conservative. We had best make sure none of our homosexual money is sent to these churches or it may corrupt them. Modern day pharasaical law must prevail! Anyone of them must be ready to cast the first stone! Rector Hopkinsville, KY Primates Meeting 2016, January 16, 2016 at 5:02 pm Here you see a man so different from his words at his installation, a man who is not a Fundamentalist but an Anglican who is alert to a changed global world, a world that demands the use of inlellect to make sense of a new emerging world, and a deep spirituality grounded n the immanent, dynamic Presence of God who is beyond all human beliefs and structural order. He is an Anglican of the first order. meaning he has a faith relationship that uses body, spirit and mind. This brings into question whether Global Soiuth elected hierarchy, and constituency are really Anglican. The Christian Colonizers taught the natives to blindly obey beliefs but never to think, especially out of the box. Jesus was given at Christmas a gift the church. He continues to have difficulty in taking this gift out of the box. Christopher Braginetz says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Jane F. Wacaster says: L Spatt says: January 15, 2016 at 6:08 pm Amen, and again I say Amen. God has sent all of us a messenger in Michael Curry that will lead us back to the Way. Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Judith Hoy says: last_img read more