10 months agoDONE DEAL: Watford defender Andrew Eleftheriou joins Braintree Town

first_imgDONE DEAL: Watford defender Andrew Eleftheriou joins Braintree Townby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford defender Andrew Eleftheriou has moved to Braintree Town on-loan to the end of the season.The 21-year-old defender follows goalkeeper Sam Howes, who moved to Eastbourne Borough, and has made the temporary move to the fellow National League side until the end of this season.The full-back made his first-team debut against Manchester City at the end of the 2016/17 season.He gained experience overseas earlier this year during a loan stint with Norwegian side Sandefjord. TagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Photo: Mick Cronin Took A Fantastic Selfie After Watching Cincinnati Beat Purdue In Overtime

first_imgMick Cronin takes selfie watching Cincinnati beat Purdue.Twitter/@CoachCroninUCCincinnati has been without head coach Mick Cronin since December, when he was diagnosed with an unruptured brain aneurysm, but he has been unwavering in his support of the team. Moments after the Bearcats’ dramatic overtime win against Purdue in today’s round of 64, a very excited Cronin took a selfie next to his television. That’s my main man !!!!!!   BEARCATS BASKETBALL.    thank you to all of our fans. pic.twitter.com/i6eFEXdSGx— Mick Cronin (@CoachCroninUC) March 20, 2015We’re glad Cronin is doing well. Watching the Bearcats isn’t quite the same without his intensity on the sideline. Cincinnati will play the winner of tonight’s Kentucky-Hampton game on Saturday.[SB Nation]last_img

Last month was Fort St Johns snowiestever March with four times the

first_imgTemperature-wise, Yu said that March 2018 was colder than normal, despite the stretch of spring-like conditions for two weeks during the middle of the month. The average temperature in Fort St. John during the month of March is -4.6 degrees Celsius, but this year the average temperature was -7.2 degrees. That only ranks it as the 28th-coldest March since record-keeping began 77 years ago. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — It’s official: Environment Canada officials say that the third month of 2018 was the snowiest-ever March in Fort St. John history.Meteorologist Cindy Yu said that the 93.3 centimetres of snow recorded at the North Peace Airport last month ranks it as the snowiest-ever March, while the 95.3 millimetres of equivalent precipitation means it was also the wettest-ever. In an average March, the 23.7 cms of snow the city sees is 3.9 times less than what fell this year. The previous record holder is March, 2002, when 77.7 cms of snow fell at the airport.Yu said that last month’s record-breaking snow amount largely came in two big dumps. The Energetic City set four daily snowfall records in March: the 1st, 2nd, 22nd, and 23rd. Yu said that those amounts are quite substantial, though not quite close to the record for snowiest March day. That record was set on March 16th, 1944 when 31 cms of snow fell. Interestingly, the snowiest day ever in Fort St. John was May 27th, 1979, when 47.8 centimetres of snow fell.last_img read more

Jet pilots threaten to stop flying from Apr 1

first_imgMumbai: The umbrella body of the domestic pilots of the nearly crippled Jet Airways Tuesday threatened to stop flying from April 1, if the resolution plan is delayed and salary dues are not cleared by the end of this month.The decision was taken at the annual meeting of Jet Airways domestic pilots body National Aviators Guild after a meeting here lasting for over 90 minutes. The guild, which came into being almost a decade ago, represents around 1,000 domestic pilots at the airline. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details”If there is no proper clarity on the resolution process and salary payments, by March 31, we will stop flying from April 1,” the guild said. Having failed to get any assurance from the management on salaries, the guild last week had written to Union labour minister Santosh Gangwar, seeking his intervention. Meanwhile, as Jet Airways, one of India’s largest airlines, hurtled towards bankruptcy, the government on Tuesday called an emergency meeting with its management. The cash-strapped carrier is struggling to make payments to its creditors and has been forced to cancel hundreds of flights as it fights competition, a weak rupee and rising fuel costs. The maintenance engineers’ union of the airline Tuesday wrote to the aviation regulator DGCA that they are owed three months of salary and flight safety “is at risk”. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from ThursdayCivil Aviation Minister Suresh Prabhu tweeted Tuesday morning that he had asked for a compliance report from Jet and the aviation watchdog, the DGCA (Directorate General of Civil Aviation) immediately. Prabhu also said he had asked for an emergency meeting on the issues such as the grounding of aircraft, advance bookings, cancellations and refunds. There are reports that the government has asked central banks to bail out Jet Airways for the moment to prevent the airline from going bankrupt. “It is a dynamic situation and there may be further attrition in coming weeks,” the aviation regulator said in a statement. Asserting that it is ensuring that all aircraft in the fleet are maintained in accordance with the approved maintenance programme, DGCA said it is “continuously monitoring the overall situation and based on the same, will take appropriate steps by the end of the month, if needed.” Earlier Tuesday, the airline said it had grounded four more planes and would delay paying interest on maturing debt in a fresh sign of deepening liquidity crisis engulfing the carrier.last_img read more

OSU gymnast falls short at Olympic trials

Junior Sean Melton competes during the 2015 P&G Championships. Courtesy of OSU athletics“If you don’t want it, it’s not going to happen.”This mantra is what junior gymnast Sean Melton lives by. He said it applies to both his team play with the Ohio State Men’s gymnastics team and his personal endeavors to go for gold in Rio.Melton travelled to St. Louis this weekend for the first step in accomplishing his Olympic dream, to participate in the U.S. Olympic Trials. 18 participants were vying for the coveted spot to represent Team USA and to hopefully earn gold at the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro.With only five gymnasts named to the U.S. Olympic team, Melton’s quest for Rio came to an end Sunday when he finished 12th. Melton was disappointed about his finish.“Trials didn’t go as well as planned,” Melton said. “I wasn’t able to do all-around either day because I was battling with some shoulder problems throughout the year. It kind of just acted up at the wrong time.”Even with battling shoulder injuries, Melton managed to finish ninth in rings and tenth in floor exercise.He feels an Olympic berth is not far away.“I’m definitely headed in the right direction,” Melton said. “It comes between a couple of tenths to who makes the Olympic team and who doesn’t. I just need to get better on everything.”His accolades as a member of OSU’s gymnastics team is what got him to participate in the Trials. A six time All-American and five time Big Ten champion, Melton won 2016 Big Ten Gymnast of the Year. The 2015 team captain also led his team to a third place finish at the NCAA Championship in April.Looking back at his accomplishments this year, Melton said he feels like he has improved immensely.“I became more of a professional in the sport,” Melton said. “I really just dedicated my life to the sport because I know that is what it takes to get to this level and to make the Olympic team.”That same dedication is what fuels his leadership ability. Melton made an extra effort to become a more established leader for his college teammates.“I stopped talking as much and started doing what I thought was right,” Melton said. “They see me having success and they want success also. It made me train harder in the gym just knowing I’m doing it for 20 other guys and not just myself. It really just made me better in all aspects of the sport.”The team is Melton’s next focus after falling short of Rio.“I’m going right back to Columbus,” Melton said. “First, I’m going to get fully healthy again. Then I’m right back to training. Start preseason for college and get ready for the NCAA season.”As for his Olympic dreams, they are still alive and well. Melton now knows exactly what he needs to do to make that leap to Olympic glory.“I know I want it just as bad as everyone else if not more because now I have a taste of it and didn’t get it,” Melton said. “It’s definitely a huge learning process. I just need to take my gymnastics to another level now.” read more

Entrepreneurs Remix the iPhone App

first_img 6 min read February 18, 2009 This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowcenter_img Austrian Michael Breidenbruecker had the same idea in his head for nearly 10 years: Create a software application that provided a personal soundtrack to your mood, movement and speech. His app would be reactive, using pre-programmed electronic music that would change according to sensory input.The problem for the 37-year-old was that available hardware wasn’t up-to-speed. The traditional desktop, laptop or mobile phone didn’t provide the sensory interface required. Then the iPhone came along.”When I saw the iPhone, I knew this was the perfect device,” says Breidenbruecker, who co-founded the music site Last.fm. “Its processors can do everything we need it to do. It has sensory input. And the thing that makes the iPhone really, really attractive for music apps is simply the fact it is a music device–people use it to listen to music.”Indeed, while many iPhone software startups focus on making a quick buck through simple games and novel gimmicks (iBeer turns the gadget into a virtual mug o’ brew), many savvy programmers are focusing on the burgeoning world of iPhone music programs and have only scratched the touch screen of possibilities. The iPhone’s tactile interface, motion-sensing accelerometer, wireless capabilities and built-in iPod music functions make it an ideal device for new legions of pocket producers and music fans alike.Musicians ranging from Brian Eno to DJ Deadmau5 have created and endorsed iPhone music apps. Though it’s not clear how many of the Apple iPhone App Store’s 20,000-plus programs focus on music, it is true that, even in this recessed economy, this new mobile platform is making instant moguls of savvy developers. The technology, startup costs and workforces involved are not as daunting as they would be if you were launching full-service software.”I think it’s such a great business model that Apple has set up for us creators,” says Jeff Muncy, creative director of Psyclops LLC, a Los Angeles-based app developer. “I don’t want to say it was completely smooth, but it wasn’t too hard. You just need to be creative and be unique. There are so many ‘me-too’ apps out there.”Breidenbruecker’s RjDj app, perhaps more than any other, exploits the iPhone’s musical capabilities. The $2.99 “album” version (there’s also a free “single” variant that’s rudimentary) lets iPhone users chose a musical “scene,” which then mutates as you speak into a connected, microphone-equipped headset. The music can also react to your movement, as it reacts to the handset’s bearing-sensing accelerometer. RjDj’s often-ambient electronic sounds are calm in conditions of silence and stillness but grow more cacophonous as volume and action ensue. Users can record the program’s reactions.”We’re pushing the boundaries of the hardware and the platform,” Breidenbruecker says, “using sound input and output and real-time signal processing.”He says his company, Reality Jockey, consists mainly of himself, one programmer and five supporting employees, and that it has yet to make a profit. But at 150,000 downloads and counting, Breidenbruecker thinks the app is well on its way to becoming an artistic and commercial success.And it could lead the way toward a new paradigm for music consumption, where fans download an ever-changing app rather than static songs, he says. Music stars could be programmers, not singers, rappers and rockers. In fact, RjDj is open to developers who want to create their own musical scenes to add to the album version. The only hurdle–one that Breidenbruecker hopes will be addressed by Apple–is that new music added to the program can’t be sold and downloaded individually. Software music production suites such as Reason usually come with standard instruments built in, but if you want a specific hip-hop drum kit, for example, you have to purchase an add-on disc. Add-ons for iPhone apps, on the contrary, don’t come packaged individually. For now, RjDj comes bundled with its music.”What we want to be is a platform for artists to produce reactive music,” Breidenbruecker says. “In order to do that right now we don’t have many options with Apple because they don’t support itemized downloads.”Still, developers are flocking to the App Store to peddle their music wares. Product developer Joy Kovaleski paired up with TV producer Muncy to get in on the action. Their product, Psyclops, launched this month and encourages children ages 8 to 14 to pair custom music tracks with animated dance moves of their choosing.”What we saw as we looked at our market was [TV’s] Randy Jackson Presents: America’s Best Dance Crew and So You Think You Can Dance,” Kovaleski says. “We felt our unique combination of music and dance that could be turned into a creative video was something that wasn’t being done.”Gaming apps seem to be the biggest sellers at the App Store, so Psyclops is a wise blend of music and game-like aspects. And the resulting music videos can be e-mailed to friends in a whirlwind of viral marketing that benefits the makers of the $1.99 program. The company’s founders hope to expand the app so that it includes a karaoke-like sing-along function, a personal photo feature and mass e-mail-blast capabilities.Like other iPhone app entrepreneurs, Muncy and Kovaleski kicked things off with zero full-time employees and have so far contracted for services such as programming and marketing. Angel investors helped them get off the ground. “We hope to sell millions,” Kovaleski says.Of course, there’s one more model when it comes to making an iPhone music app: Free. Eric Redlinger, researcher-in-residence at Brooklyn Polytechnic University’s Integrated Digital Media Institute, used the school’s resources to develop Mrmr, an app that allows electronic musicians to control digital gear wirelessly with their iPhones. It can be used, for example to control a DJ’s set via Ableton Live software, or it can even be the remote control for a live VJ. It also allows collaboration with more than one iPhone user during a performance.”It’s not been my calling to make 99-cent apps,” Redlinger, 35, says. “I’m much more interested in building a platform that people will use.”Because Mrmr is open-source, programmers can join in its evolution and add useful features by contributing to its code. It’s free at the App Store, so anyone with an iPhone or iPod Touch can benefit from the work of others. And so can Redlinger, as it turns out.”Of course I’m the world’s expert on this technology,” he says, “being the author of it.”This allows him some entrepreneurial leverage. Companies that want to use Mrmr for custom jobs–say to control an in-house multimedia presentation–would need to hire Redlinger or someone like him. And having the app all over the world as a free download only helps advertise his services.”What I’m able to do is make specific Mrmr builds for specific purposes,” he says. “You need to pay the rent.” Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more